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TRANSMISSION OIL SUCTION SYSTEM IN INCLINED SUMP CONDITIONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247847D
Publication Date: 2016-Oct-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 321K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The transmission oil is usually supplied from a pressurized oil circuit. It is circulated through the internal components which need a certain flow of oil for lubricating or cooling purpose. In dry sump transmissions, the entire oil is collected usually in the bottom of the transmission housing and it is drained by gravity or by the use of a scavenge system. When the sump is not horizontal, that point of suction is not the lowest point any more, and the oil gets accumulated in other places of the transmission case, where it can create excessive churning and drag losses of rotating components as well as heat accumulation in that volume of oil. A system to avoid such malfunction is proposed.

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TRANSMISSION OIL SUCTION SYSTEM IN INCLINED SUMP CONDITIONS

The transmission oil is usually supplied from a pressurized oil circuit. It is circulated through the internal components which need a certain flow of oil for lubricating or cooling purpose.

In dry sump transmissions, the entire oil is collected usually in the bottom of the transmission housing and it is drained by gravity or by the use of a scavenge system.

The scavenge pump or G-Rotor which moves a mixture of air and oil out of the transmission case creates the necessary suction to pull the oil out and put it through the drain circuit (usually back to a reservoir).

Normal Operation

In normal operation, the oil is sucked from a tube with a screen filter to avoid the possible debris or damaging particles that enter the pump or G-Rotor. The main issue concerning the suction of the entire oil while avoiding its accumulation in the transmission is that the oil is usually extracted from a unique point in the sump. That point is usually the lowest point in the transmission.

Introduction



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Problems with existing solution

When the sump is not horizontal, that point of suction is not the lowest point any more, and the oil gets accumulated in other places of the transmission case, where it can create excessive churning and drag losses of rotating components as well as heat accumulation in that volume of oil.

Proposed solution

Extracting the oil from those accumulation areas when the transmission is no...