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PROACTIVE THREAT DETECTION, TRACKING, AND WARNING SYSTEM THROUGH WI-FI ADVANCED WIDE ACCESS CONTROLLER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247887D
Publication Date: 2016-Oct-10
Document File: 16 page(s) / 2M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Gilbert George: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A system integrates audio, video and Wi-Fi® components to detect a physical security threat. These components are integrated and orchestrated to detect, track and warn of security threats.

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PROACTIVE THREAT DETECTION, TRACKING, AND WARNING SYSTEM THROUGH WI-FI ADVANCED WIDE ACCESS CONTROLLER

AUTHORS:

  Gilbert George
Shankar Ramanathan
Gonzalo Salgueiro


M. David Hanes

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    A system integrates audio, video and Wi-Fi® components to detect a physical security threat. These components are integrated and orchestrated to detect, track and warn of security threats.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    Wi-Fi access points (APs) occupy ceiling/wall real estate in many hospitals, malls, schools, universities, retail and enterprise areas, etc. While they provide efficient wireless and network security, APs also have the potential to secure human life. Public safety and protection is a global concern, and current wireless infrastructures should include features that bring intelligence to assess, act, track, and alleviate security threats.

    Currently, there is no option to detect, warn, and act on a threat through the wireless network (using APs or controllers). Systems presented herein use wireless and other existing technologies to detect, track, and warn of security threats. Threat data and information is collected from various sensors. The data and information can then be passed from the AP to the Wireless Local Area Network (LAN) Controller (WLC), thereby alerting via a Mobility Services Engine (MSE) or Connected Mobile Experience (CMX). In other instances, data can flow directly from the audio, video, and wireless sensors to analytics algorithms and processing in a data center or "Fog" node.

Copyright 2016 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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    Presented herein are processes of appending sound detector modules and integrated surveillance cameras, Internet Protocol (IP) phones and existing Wi-Fi infrastructure capabilities in either an integrated or distributed format for education, health, retail and enterprise wireless networks. The data from these sensors are processed to allow for threat detection, tracking and warning those who might be in danger.

    To cater to varied customer infrastructure needs, the following deployment models are provided:


• Integrated: Single device containing AP, audio detection, and surveillance camera.


• Distributed: Standalone APs, separate audio detection on phones or video conferencing devices, separate surveillance camera.

    Each of these deployment models are discussed in detail below. A hybrid deployment model is also possible where these two approaches are mixed within an environment.

Integrated Model

    As illustrated in Figure 1 below, the integrated model merges audio, video, and AP modules into a single unit, thereby saving deployment real estate and product maintenance. This approach works well for hallways and common areas.

Copyright 2016 Cisco Systems, Inc.

2


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Figure 1

    This model may be used by those who wish to implement threat detection and tracking features using an existing network infrastructure. In a distributed model, the sensors, such as a Cisco lightweight AP...