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Method and System for Dynamically Tailoring Over-Provisioning of Flash-Based Storage Systems Based on User Performance Requirements

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247895D
Publication Date: 2016-Oct-10
Document File: 3 page(s) / 329K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed are a method and system that dynamically tailor over-provisioning of flash-based storage systems based on user performance requirements. The method and system allow the user to maximize the amount of available storage, which is expensive, without compromising the application performance requirements.

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Method and System for Dynamically Tailoring Over-Provisioning of Flash-Based Storage Systems Based on User Performance Requirements

All flash-based storage systems use some sort of over-provisioning. The flash-based storage systems advertise less space to users than the actual storage media contains and use the extra space for mapping out bad blocks and improving overall performance of the system with more efficient garbage collection. In general, more over-provisioning provides better write performance, but limits how much usable space the system presents. Because flash storage is typically expensive, users want to have as much space available as possible without compromising performance. Currently, vendors may provide a couple of arbitrary performance settings, or possibly none at all, without any regard to the

customer's performance needs.

As illustrated in Figure 1, with current systems, the size of a volume presented to a server is larger than the physical amount of storage space available. As the server accesses the volume, the array allocates an extent on-the-fly and maps it to the next available storage location. The server does not know nor care how much physical space there really is.

Figure 1: Background: Thin provisioning overview

As shown in Figure 2, a certain percentage of raw space is quarantined and unavailable for the server to use as storage; usually statically defined at 10 -20%. As writes enter the solid-state drive (SSD) from the server, those writes must be mapped to fully erased blocks (this is called Logical-to-Physical mapping). The SSD utilizes the overprovisioned sp...