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Down Hole Power Generation System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000248043D
Publication Date: 2016-Oct-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 10K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This system generates power at a down hole location of interest. It is run on coiled tubing, drill pipe, tubing, or casing. This system would be run with other bottom-hole-assemblies (BHAs) which require electric power for activation or operation. This system could therefore be used to provide electric power for activating or operating intelligent wellbore intervention tools and systems, either one-time or multiple times, on demand.

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Down Hole Power Generation System

     This system generates power at a down hole location of interest. It is run on coiled tubing, drill pipe, tubing, or casing. This system would be run with other bottom-hole-assemblies (BHAs) which require electric power for activation or operation. This system could therefore be used to provide electric power for activating or operating intelligent wellbore intervention tools and systems, either one-time or multiple times, on demand.

     This system consists of an electric generator and a means of rotationally locking the generator stator relative to its rotor (a casing gripping device such as a packer or casing anchor), allowing the rotor to rotate freely within it. In the preferred embodiment, it is run on drill pipe above an intelligent wellbore intervention system which requires a DC or AC power to operate. The electric generator consists of a rotor (fitted with magnets) which turns within a stationary stator (housing containing electrical windings). When the rotor is turned, an electrical current is generated. Turning the rotor at a known RPM would generate a direct current of a desired value, which can be used to activate or operate another BHA. A system such as this would be operated by first anchoring the stator using a casing packer or anchor, and then rotating the rotor within the housing, creating the electric current. This system could be used to provide current for activating or operating intelligent wellbore intervention tools and systems, either one- time or multiple times, on demand.

     In a coiled tubing application, the generator could be operated by pumping through a small progressive-cavity-pump or turbine-style pump, to turn the rotor. An alternative embodiment would be to place the housing (windings) in the interior, and place the magnets in an outer housing which rotates about the windings. In yet another embodiment, the stator could be mounted in larger diameter casing, either permanently, or in a way in which it could be retrieved, and the rotor could be conveyed into the well using jointed pipe or coiled tubing. In this last application, when the rotor is located adjacent to the housing and rotated, electrical current would be generated at that location. A series of these housings could be used throughout the wellbore to generate current at multiple discrete locati...