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Method of Authorizing Detected Tethered Wireless Clients in a WLAN Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000248064D
Publication Date: 2016-Oct-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The solution is to authenticate/authorize tethered clients such that only genuine users can access internet via tethering. This is done by re-directing the detected tethered flows and enforcing captive-portal to authenticate the tethered clients. The benefits of this system include securing the wireless network, allowing access to only genuine tethered clients, and optimizing the usage of network bandwidth.

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Method of Authorizing Detected Tethered Wireless Clients in a WLAN Environment

     In smart phones, tablets and other wireless devices, tethering allows sharing of an internet connection. Tethering allows sharing of an internet connection with other devices, however it can result in security issues, misuse of bandwidth, and network clogging. Standard network policies would just block the detected tethered flows or even block the tethering wireless client, but there may be genuine users connecting via hotspot.

     Tethered flows in a wireless network can be detected using methods like NAT flows originating from a wireless client, operating system mismatch between flows, or detecting actual client connected, round-trip-time between AP radio and client varies for tethered flows.

     The solution is to authenticate/authorize tethered clients such that only genuine users can access internet via tethering. This is done by re-directing the detected tethered flows and enforcing captive- portal to authenticate the tethered clients. The benefits of this system include securing the wireless network, allowing access to only genuine tethered clients, and optimizing the usage of network bandwidth.

The process includes:

1. On a WLAN, multiple clients connect to the network; a few of which can share their connection to other users via a hotspot/Bluetooth

2. On the WLAN firewall, for each new connection, a flow is created. A flow originates from a tethered client can be detected using below...