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NETWORK VISUALIZATION TOOL USING 3D VISUAL DIAGRAMS TO DESCRIBE VIRTUAL NETWORK FUNCTIONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000248148D
Publication Date: 2016-Nov-01
Document File: 20 page(s) / 1M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A network visualization tool uses three dimensional visual diagrams to describe Virtual Network Functions (VNFs). The tool allows operators who administer, provision, maintain, and consume these VNF services, such as telecommunications companies, cloud services providers, and their customers, to see a physical representation of the virtual computing resources used in these services. In the vertical dimension, the flow of data is shown from the physical, traditional network layers, up through the physical data-center infrastructure such as servers and top-of-rack switches, and then through the server, into the virtual machine layer, finally up into the discrete software processes that make up the individual VNFs in the service chain. In the horizontal dimension, the multiplicity of individual stacks of these resources is shown, allowing for visualization of resource redundancy, fail-over scenarios, and other situations requiring side-by-side visualization of adjacent physical and virtual resource stacks and their corresponding data paths. In the depth dimension, the clustering of layers into larger layer groups is shown, as well as diagraming the resource redundancy and fail-over scenarios that are configured to occur within a given resource stack. By harnessing three dimensions, the tool allows the user to visually see and make sense of the complicated deployment of virtual resources in one coherent view, a capability heretofore unknown in the software solutions currently offered in the industry.

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NETWORK VISUALIZATION TOOL USING 3D VISUAL DIAGRAMS TO DESCRIBE VIRTUAL NETWORK FUNCTIONS

ABSTRACT

[0001]               A network visualization tool uses three dimensional visual diagrams to describe Virtual Network Functions (VNFs).  The tool allows operators who administer, provision, maintain, and consume these VNF services, such as telecommunications companies, cloud services providers, and their customers, to see a physical representation of the virtual computing resources used in these services.  In the vertical dimension, the flow of data is shown from the physical, traditional network layers, up through the physical data-center infrastructure such as servers and top-of-rack switches, and then through the server, into the virtual machine layer, finally up into the discrete software processes that make up the individual VNFs in the service chain.  In the horizontal dimension, the multiplicity of individual stacks of these resources is shown, allowing for visualization of resource redundancy, fail-over scenarios, and other situations requiring side-by-side visualization of adjacent physical and virtual resource stacks and their corresponding data paths.  In the depth dimension, the clustering of layers into larger layer groups is shown, as well as diagraming the resource redundancy and fail-over scenarios that are configured to occur within a given resource stack.   By harnessing three dimensions, the tool allows the user to visually see and make sense of the complicated deployment of virtual resources in one coherent view, a capability heretofore unknown in the software solutions currently offered in the industry.

DRAWINGS

[0002]               FIG. 1 shows a schematic diagram of a system in accordance with one or more embodiments of the invention.

[0003]               FIG. 2 shows a flowchart in accordance with one or more embodiments of the invention.

[0004]               FIG. 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4 show an example in accordance with one or more embodiments of the invention.

[0005]               FIGS. 4.1 and 4.2 show computing systems in accordance with one or more embodiments of the invention. 

DESCRIPTION

[0006]               Specific embodiments of the invention will now be described in detail with reference to the accompanying figures.  Like elements in the various figures are denoted by like reference numerals for consistency. 

[0007]               In the following detailed description of embodiments of the invention, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a more thorough understanding of the invention.  However, it will be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that the invention may be practiced without these specific details.  In other instances, well-known features have not been described in detail to avoid unnecessarily complicating the description.

[0008]               Throughout this disclosure, ordinal numbers (e.g., first, second, third, etc.) may be used as an adjective for an element (i.e., any noun in the application).  The use of ordinal numbers is not to imply or create any particular or...