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RECOVERY OF OTUCn CONTROL PLANE BANDWIDTH DURING PARTIAL OTSiG FAILURES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000248166D
Publication Date: 2016-Nov-02

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Recovery mechanisms are described for Optical Transport Unit-Cn (OTUCn) control plane bandwidth during partial Optical Tributary Signal (OTSi) failures. These mechanisms enable a Software Defined Networking (SDN) controller or control plane (e.g., ASON, GMPLS, etc.) to reconfigured a partially failed OTUCn and OTSiG based on the still working OTSi carriers. Advantageously, the partially recovered bandwidth can be a significant amount, such as, for example, an OTUC4 with 4xOTSi 100G channels with a failure would remove 400G of bandwidth from the network with the failure of a single OTSi, but with the approach described herein, the network would recover 300G of bandwidth. Further, the control plane can restore the full capacity once the failed OTSi channel is recovered. The recovery mechanisms include control plane actions to overcome the loss of usable bandwidth responsive to an OTSi carrier failure in an OTSiG.

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RECOVERY OF OTUCn CONTROL PLANE BANDWIDTH DURING PARTIAL OTSiG FAILURES

ABSTRACT

[0001]               Recovery mechanisms are described for Optical Transport Unit-Cn (OTUCn) control plane bandwidth during partial Optical Tributary Signal (OTSi) failures.  These mechanisms enable a Software Defined Networking (SDN) controller or control plane (e.g., ASON, GMPLS, etc.) to reconfigured a partially failed OTUCn and OTSiG based on the still working OTSi carriers.  Advantageously, the partially recovered bandwidth can be a significant amount, such as, for example, an OTUC4 with 4xOTSi 100G channels with a failure would remove 400G of bandwidth from the network with the failure of a single OTSi, but with the approach described herein, the network would recover 300G of bandwidth.  Further, the control plane can restore the full capacity once the failed OTSi channel is recovered.  The recovery mechanisms include control plane actions to overcome the loss of usable bandwidth responsive to an OTSi carrier failure in an OTSiG. 

DESCRIPTION

[0002]               In high bandwidth optical transport networks, recent standards such as ITU-T Recommendation G.709 “Interfaces for the optical transport network” (06/2016), the contents of which are incorporated by reference, describe the use of multiple optical carriers for a single digital transport interface in line side applications, such as an Optical Transport Unit-Cn (OTUCn) which is carried via multiple Optical Tributary Signal (OTSi) carriers (lambdas) (e.g., OTSi groups (OTSiG)).   The multichannel OTUCn transport mechanism with multiple lower rate OTSi channels is considered failed if any one channel fails (ITU-T Recommendation G.798).  While the Subnetwork Connection (SNC) services can be restored on other channels, the entire OTUCn Line will remain failed until repaired.  Therefore, in a Control Plane network, the failure of any one OTSi channel removes the entire bandwidth of the OTUCn from the network.  The bandwidth can be a significant amount; for example, an OTUC4 with 4xOTSi 100G channels would remove 400Gb/s of bandwidth from the network during the failure of a single OTSi 100G channel.

FIG. 1: OTUCn multi-channel concept formed by multiple OTSi channels within an OTSiG.

[0003]               The OTSiG functions as a single channel carrying the OTUCn (FIG. 1).  The OTUCn mapping requires Optical Data Unit (ODU) containers to be mapped into the OTSi channels (FIG. 2). As per standard the OTSi channels within an OTSiG share a common path, and are subject to common failures; the failure of one OTSi results in a failure of the entire OTSiG and thus the OTUCn (ref. G.798).

FIG. 2: ODU Containers mapped into OPUCn containers which are then mapped to OTSi Channels (ref. G.709)

[0004]               Adaptation of a control plane either through a Software Defined Networking (SDN) Controller or an in-band distributed control plane (e.g., ASON, GMPLS, OSRP, etc.) to the OTSiG Lines is relatively straight forward, as the OTSiG contains similar funct...