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Additive mixture for stabilization of polyol and polyurethane

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000248210D
Publication Date: 2016-Nov-09

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The article relates to a composition, which comprises the components (a) an organic material susceptible to oxidative, thermal or light-induced degradation, which is a poly-ether polyol, a polyester polyol or a polyurethane; (b) a bisphenolic stabilizer of formula I as described in the article and a chromanol stabilizer of formula II as described in the article. A process for manufacturing the aforementioned composition, the use of an additive mixture comprising component (b) and (c) for stabilizing the component (a) and the additive mixture itself are also described.

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Additive mixture for stabilization of polyol and polyurethane

This article relates to a composition comprising a polyether polyol, a polyester polyol or a polyurethane as component (a) and an additive mixture for stabilizing component (a). The additive mixture comprises a specific bisphenolic stabilizer as component (b) and a

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specific chromanol stabilizer as component (c). A process for manufacturing the afore- mentioned composition, the use of the additive mixture for stabilizing the component
(a) and the additive mixture itself are addressed.

Polyurethane is widespreadly used as an engineering material in many technical appli-

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cations. Like many organic materials, polyurethane is susceptible to degradation caused by exposure to energy or chemically reactive species. There is on one side already the initial exothermic reaction of the starting materials polyol and di- or polyiso- cyanates forming the polyurethane itself and on the other side the long-term exposure during its operating time. The formed polyurethane might further be initially exposed to 15

an industrial processing, for example in case of a thermoplastic polyurethane an extru- sion under elevated temperature and high shear forces. In case of a polyurethane foam, the initial exothermic reaction of the starting materials is conducted under condi- tions, where a foaming agent like water is bubbling up. A polyether polyol or a polyester polyol is often used as a polyol starting material of a polyurethane, if a polyurethane

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with a soft foam consistency is desired. A polyether polyol or a polyester polyol are themselves already organic materials susceptible to degradation caused by exposure to energy or chemically reactive species. If they are employed already in a marred state as a starting material for a polyurethane, this is not beneficial for resistance of the formed polyurethane. 25

US 5695689 discloses polyether polyols, which are stabilized by tocopherols. In some of its examples, -tocopherol is or -tocopherol and octylated diphenylamine are add- ed to a polyether polyol as stabilizer during production of polyurethane foams.

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WO 93/10178 discloses polyethers containing an antioxidant as well as polyurethanes made from such polyethers. In some of its examples, polyurethane foams are prepared based on the reaction of polyols and toluene diisocyanate in the presence of inter alia an -tocopherol mixture and Irganox L 135 (RTM) as antioxidants. Irganox L 135 is stated as a commercial grade of 3,5-di-t-butyl-4-hydroxyhydrocinnamic acid ester of a

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mixture of C7-C9 alcohols.

Despite of a series of already available stabilizer concepts, there is still a need for fur- ther technical concepts towards an improved stabilization of a polyether polyol, a poly- ester polyol or a polyurethane against the detrimental impact of heat, light and / or oxi-

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dation. In addition to the desired stabilization effect, the technical concept preferably allows a simplif...