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COMPRESSOR GUIDE VANE ACTUATION FOR GAS TURBINE ENGINE WITH RADIAL INLET

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000248342D
Publication Date: 2016-Nov-16
Document File: 9 page(s) / 284K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The invention relates to aircraft engines including a radial inlet. Specifically, an aircraft engine with a radial inlet and variable geometry is disclosed.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 31% of the total text.

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COMPRESSOR GUIDE VANE ACTUATION FOR GAS TURBINE ENGINE WITH RADIAL INLET

TECHNICAL FIELD

    The invention relates to aircraft engines including a radial inlet. Specifically, an aircraft engine with a radial inlet and variable geometry is disclosed.

BACKGROUND

    Gas turbines include, but are not limited to, gas turbine power generation equipment and gas turbine aircraft engines. A gas turbine includes a core engine having a compressor to compress the air flow entering the core engine, a combustor in which a mixture of fuel and the compressed air is burned to generate a propulsive gas flow, and a turbine which is rotated by the propulsive gas flow and which is connected by a shaft to drive the compressor. A gas turbine engine usually also includes one or more mechanically-driven accessories, such as fuel or oil pumps, generators or alternators, control units, and the like. Such accessories are mounted to an accessory gearbox (AGB) which extracts torque from the engine, and drives each accessory at the required rotational speed, using an internal gear train. Precise control of the fuel flow to the combustor is critical to engine stability and efficiency. This function is controlled by a fuel metering unit (FMU), otherwise known as a fuel control unit (FCU). The FCU may be either mechanical, electronic, or a combination of the two.

     In a typical gas turbine engine, the compressor is mounted forward of the combustor and turbine in an axial arrangement. Air enters the compressor through the opening in the front of the nacelle, often passing through a fan section followed by a low pressure compressor prior to


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entering a high pressure compressor. The accessory gearbox is usually mounted radially outward of the compressor. A tower shaft that is driven by bevel gears off of the drive shaft is typically used to transfer power from the drive shaft to the AGB that is located outside of the exterior casing of the gas turbine engine and inside the nacelle or engine bay.

    Alternatively, usually in smaller engines such as turboprop or turboshaft engines, the compressor can be mounted aft of the turbine and combustor. An example of a known turboprop engine is shown in Figs. 1 and 2. In this arrangement, air enters the engine toward the aft of the engine, is pressurized by a compressor, ignited in the combustor, and the energy from the hot gasses is harvested by a turbine section. The air inlet extends radially from the back of the compressor section and is thus known as a radial inlet engine. The turbine section includes a turbine connected to the compressor and a turbine connected to the propeller. The two turbines are connected to different shafts. The aft turbine and corresponding shaft power the compressor and the AGB, while the forward turbine and corresponding shaft power the propeller. The AGB is located at the rear of the engine aft of the compressor and much nearer to the drive shaft than in a conventional turbofan engine. The AGB d...