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CIRCUIT BREAKER BUILT INTO A POWER CORD OR A POWER SOCKET ADAPTOR

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000248439D
Publication Date: 2016-Nov-29
Document File: 4 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Protective devices such as fuses, circuit breakers, and thermal cutouts have been customarily provided in a wide variety of formats and capabilities. Some of these devices are intended for use in high power applications such as for protecting utility equipment while others are intended for use in low power applications such as for protecting a circuit board inside a product. The placement of these protective devices is often driven by the nature of the application. For example, a large capacity circuit breaker may be placed in the basement of a residence where power enters the residence whereas a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) may be placed next to a kitchen sink where there is a greater likelihood of a ground fault caused by water leakage. Other factors that determine selection, placement, or even the inclusion of a protective device can include cost, convenience, and packaging ________________________________ If you wish to view the CPA Global group email disclaimer, please click here ________________________________

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CIRCUIT BREAKER BUILT INTO A POWER CORD OR A POWER SOCKET ADAPTOR

Ouren, Bradley J.

Protective devices such as fuses, circuit breakers, and thermal cutouts have been customarily provided in a wide variety of formats and capabilities.  Some of these devices are intended for use in high power applications such as for protecting utility equipment while others are intended for use in low power applications such as for protecting a circuit board inside a product.  The placement of these protective devices is often driven by the nature of the application.  For example, a large capacity circuit breaker may be placed in the basement of a residence where power enters the residence whereas a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) may be placed next to a kitchen sink where there is a greater likelihood of a ground fault caused by water leakage.  Other factors that determine selection, placement, or even the inclusion of a protective device can include cost, convenience, and packaging.  

With specific reference to packaging, products such as home appliances (hair dryers, stereo equipment, television sets, home computers etc.) are often driven by commercial factors that include a policy more directed towards product replacement rather than repair when a product turns defective.   This policy is understandable because in many cases it can be more cost effective to replace a damaged product than to use the services of a technician to repair the damaged product.  Furthermore, given the speed of product innovation nowadays, the damaged product may be out of date and not only lack state of the art features but may be difficult to repair due to non-availability of replacement parts.

As a result, many product vendors have discontinued the inclusion of protective devices such as fuses or circuit breakers, inside their products.  Unfortunately, the exclusion of such protective devices can be hazardous to users of these products.  For example, there are a large number of power outlets in use today that do not include protective elements for preventing a product such as a smartphone or a laptop from drawing excessive current and causing a battery explosion and/or fire.   

Consequently, in view of such traditional shortcomings, two products are proposed herein in this paper.  Figure 1 below shows a first product - a power socket adaptor that can be plugged into a wall socket and prove particularly useful when the wall socket does not include a circuit breaker.  The power socket adaptor incorporates a thermal circuit breaker that can be incorporated into the power socket adaptor during manufacture of the power socket adaptor.  A thermal reset button provided on the face of the power socket adaptor allows a user to reset the thermal circuit breaker after tripping of the thermal circuit breaker due to an excessive heat condition.  The excessive heat condition can be caused by various factors such as a short circuit in a product that is plugged into the...