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Intercept User Input to Avoid Unintended Clicks or Route to Intended Elements

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000248676D
Publication Date: 2016-Dec-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 142K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a client side (either browser or computer or console) solution that safeguards against unwanted clicks on components that recently experienced a change in a user interface.

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Intercept User Input to Avoid Unintended Clicks or Route to Intended Elements

With highly complex and interactive websites, components frequently load in an asynchronous manner. For example, a website could load external Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), link to a streaming video, and connect to JavaScript* hosted on another webserver. Because of the asynchronous loading or disparate components, frequently a user can experience a website in these first few seconds that rapidly changes until all sources are loaded. Some pages also load full page adds shortly after page load or while a user scrolls through an article. Further, many websites spawn full-page advertisements shortly after the page is loaded.

A method is needed to guard against unintended clicks in a user interface during the time when components rapidly change.

The novel contribution is a client side (either browser or computer or console) solution that safeguards against clicks on components that recently experienced a change.

While in a browser, for example, a user clicks on an element that recently (within milliseconds) experienced either a position change, element change, or any additional change in the Document Object Model (DOM) element before clicking. In response, several possible embodiments include ignoring the click, displaying a popup confirming the user's intended element of click, or passing the click onto the element that would have received it before the most recent content update.

A similar solution can apply to console games within which a list of spawn locations always appears in a certain order, and then it experiences a change. The user may click instinctively where the intended spawn location is in the list and not realize that a...