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Automated Adjustment Procedure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000248807D
Publication Date: 2017-Jan-12
Document File: 6 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Recent standards for automated ultrasonic testing typically frequently require an adjustment of the test beams dependent on the signal response of an artificial defect with regard to the beam to be adjusted. This ensures, that there is a clear correlation between important defect properties, as for example depth and length of a crack or the equivalent reflector size of an inclusion. It is considered crucial for the application, to have the adjustment done on test pieces manufactured in to material samples or finished parts taken from the same material process as the material which shall be inspected thereafter. This avoids the need of transfer corrections in terms of amplitude or sound velocity. However, with the increased popularity of phased-array systems, the number of test beams targeting for different defect types has increased and will further do in the future. Herein, we present a procedure to simplify the adjustment procedure. It is assumed, that a certain number of reference defects is present in the test part. These defects should ideally be identical with the most important defect types mentioned in appropriable standards, to ensure the consistency with former test adjustment concepts. For these defects, a conventional calibration is carried out. The remaining not adjusted beams are then sorted with respect to one or more master beams and their amplitude gain will be determined on a mathematical relation. The necessary mathematical relations can be determined either by theoretical considerations, simulations or results obtained in a laboratory. Having chosen the master beams carefully, this ensures a reasonable amplitude adjustment for these parts.

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Technical Paper

Automated Adjustment Procedure

Christof Breidenbach and Stephan Falter

1GE Sensing & Inspection Technologies GmbH, Robert-Bosch-Str. 3, Hürth, Germany

Abstract

Recent standards for automated ultrasonic testing typically frequently require an adjustment of the test beams dependent on the signal response of an artificial defect with regard to the beam to be adjusted. This ensures, that there is a clear correlation between important defect properties, as for example depth and length of a crack or the equivalent reflector size of an inclusion. It is considered crucial for the application, to have the adjustment done on test pieces manufactured in to material samples or finished parts taken from the same material process as the material which shall be inspected thereafter. This avoids the need of transfer corrections in terms of amplitude or sound velocity. However, with the increased popularity of phased-array systems, the number of test beams targeting for different defect types has increased and will further do in the future. Herein, we present a procedure to simplify the adjustment procedure. It is assumed, that a certain number of reference defects is present in the test part. These defects should ideally be identical with the most important defect types mentioned in appropriable standards, to ensure the consistency with former test adjustment concepts. For these defects, a conventional calibration is carried out. The remaining not adjusted beams are then sorted with respect to one or more master beams and their amplitude gain will be determined on a mathematical relation. The necessary mathematical relations can be determined either by theoretical considerations, simulations or results obtained in a laboratory. Having chosen the master beams carefully, this ensures a reasonable amplitude adjustment for these parts.

Keywords: Ultrasound, Phased-Array, Adjustment

1. Fundamentals of adjustment procedures

1.1 Basics

Ultrasonic testing machines are based on the response signals of ultrasonic beams into a material to be inspected for discontinuities like cracks or inclusions. These ultrasonic beams are generated by an ultrasonic transducer which is driven by a suitable electronic device that on the one hand excites the ultrasonic beam by an electric impulse and on the other hand provides a reception device, which allows to detect and record ultrasonic echoes travelling out of the material back to the ultrasonic transducers. The recorded signals are referenced to as A-Scans and the complete procedure of generating the ultrasonic beam and detecting ultrasonic signals as response of the inspected material to the ultrasonic beam is typically called an ultrasonic test shot.

It shall be noted, that said ultrasonic shot characterizes one inspection type at one position of the material. Under normal circumstances, the ultrasonic shots can only cover a restricted part of the material. In addition, due to their physical features, only a cer...