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Robotic Vacuum Substance Detection and Auto Shut Off

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000249027D
Publication Date: 2017-Jan-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed are a method and system to detect an unwanted type of substance for robotic vacuum cleanup and automatically shut off the device before it unintentionally spreads substances to other surfaces.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

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Robotic Vacuum Substance Detection and Auto Shut Off

Most robotic vacuums detect and avoid obstacles and drop-offs (e.g., stairs). Some, in addition to vacuuming, apply liquids and scrub the cleaning surface. However, a robotic vacuum device may inadvertently spread a liquid substance (e.g., paint, unpleasant animal residue, any liquid or unpleasant odor) around the rest of the house after going over it or drawing it in. No existing robotic vacuum models detect nor have a means of avoiding such substances.

The novel contribution is method and system to detect an unwanted type of substance for robotic vacuum cleanup and automatically shut off the device before it unintentionally spreads substances to other surfaces. The system provides a means for the robotic vacuum device to determine if it is in close proximity to a potentially problematic liquid/substance and then automatically shut off to prevent the substance from spreading throughout the rest of the area. To facilitate easy location and cleanup, the device stops the vacuum near the problematic condition. Further, the device issues an alert to the user.

To configure an autonomous surface cleaning robot to detect unwanted cleaning conditions: 1. Activate an autonomous surface cleaning robot control device (e.g., an application on a mobile device) 2. Activate one or more of the robot's sensors (e.g., liquid detection, unpleasant odor detection, etc.) 3. The robot control device communicates the sensor settings to the robot 4. The robot stores the new settings on board...