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METHOD FOR FINISHING A GLASS EDGE WITH REDUCED PARTICLES AND SUBSURFACE DAMAGE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000249038D
Publication Date: 2017-Jan-27
Document File: 11 page(s) / 1M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The display product market is demanding high resolution displays and lower costs. However, providing high resolution displays generally requires more expensive processes that result in a lower surface roughness, lower subsurface damage, and a reduced amount of edge particles. Thus, a goal of this research to provide a glass substrate having an edge that is residual crack free and/or has lower subsurface damage and can provide a smaller amount of the released grinding debris (i.e., a lower amount of residual edge particles). This residual crack free and/or lower sub-surface damaged edge can be generated by multiple steps of edge grinding & polishing. This is especially apparent when, as the final step of polishing, an edge polish wheel having a super-fine abrasive grain size (#1000 or higher mesh size) is applied. The super fine finished edge provides low edge roughness (<0.05 μm Ra) and a higher edge strength while generating minimal edge particles.

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METHOD FOR FINISHING A GLASS EDGE WITH REDUCED PARTICLES AND

SUBSURFACE DAMAGE

ABSTRACT

The display product market is demanding high resolution displays and lower costs.

However, providing high resolution displays generally requires more expensive processes that

result in a lower surface roughness, lower subsurface damage, and a reduced amount of edge

particles. Thus, a goal of this research to provide a glass substrate having an edge that is residual

crack free and/or has lower subsurface damage and can provide a smaller amount of the released

grinding debris (i.e., a lower amount of residual edge particles). This residual crack free and/or

lower sub-surface damaged edge can be generated by multiple steps of edge grinding &

polishing. This is especially apparent when, as the final step of polishing, an edge polish wheel

having a super-fine abrasive grain size (#1000 or higher mesh size) is applied. The super fine

finished edge provides low edge roughness (<0.05 µm Ra) and a higher edge strength while

generating minimal edge particles.

BACKGROUND & SUMMARY

The display product market is trending toward higher resolution displays. Meanwhile,

customer cost reduction activities have been accelerated in display product designs (e.g., GOA

(Gate on Array) panels and 1G1D (One Gate One Drain) panels). These trends and activities

have revealed a need to reduce residual surface particles that result from processing of the glass

substrates which make up these display panels. Moreover, it has been realized that edge particles,

left over from various processing steps, have a high impact on the amount of surface particles

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found on the surface of a glass substrate after processing. This has been shown through particle

mapping of the surfaces of the glass substrates and measuring glass substrate particles by various

processes. Surface particle upset has also been confirmed. For example, during a chemical wash

treatment (e.g., applying hydrofluoric acid to a glass substrate) it was found that edge particles

actually migrate to the surface of the glass substrate during such chemical wash treatments,

increasing the amount of surface particles. Thus, a goal of this research is to reduce edge

particles and improve edge quality to resist chemical attacks (i.e., chemical wash treatments).

Typical glass substrate edge finishing methods and apparatuses employ a course grinding

wheel followed by a finer wheel to effectively change the shape of the edge and provide the

required strength to resist handling induced damage/glass breakage. Alternatives to this method

include belt finishing, minimal edge finishing, etc. These alternatives all intend to remove sharp

edges (or corners) of as-cut glass and make the edges conducive for handling. The resulting edge

from these methods have higher average surface roughnesses, Ra (e.g., 0.3 µm -1 µm or above),

higher subsurface damage, and a greater amount of edge particles. In some applications, these

characteristics are toler...