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GLOVES FOR CARE IN INFANT INCUBATOR

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000249057D
Publication Date: 2017-Jan-31
Document File: 3 page(s) / 133K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A glove for care of an infant in an infant incubator is disclosed. The gloves comprise a pair of flexible elements which extend in the form of gloves and are engaged at a location where conventional portholes are provided in conventional infant incubators. When a care giver inserts both hands in the pair of flexible elements, the care giver has gloves donned over the hands while tending to the infant inside the infant incubator.

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GLOVES FOR CARE IN INFANT INCUBATOR

BACKGROUND

 

The present disclosure relates generally to an infant incubator and more particularly to gloves used for care in the infant incubator.

Generally, an infant incubator has a patient compartment for housing an infant and providing optimal micro-environment. The optimal micro-environment includes temperature, humidity and oxygen levels maintained at levels optimal for the infant. The patient compartment also has provision for two small openings, referred to as portholes. The portholes are used to access the infant for minor care activities.

Portholes are opened and closed several times in a day for tending the infant, doing small interventions or making small adjustments inside the patient compartment. Whenever the porthole is opened, it leads to loss of controlled micro-environment parameters like temperature, humidity and oxygen. Each such disturbance in the micro-environment parameters takes time to recover and achieve the earlier set parameters. Further, with frequent opening of the potholes possibility of air-borne infection increases due to exposure to external air. Furthermore, opening and closing the porthole cover in the incubator creates a click sound every time when operated. Also, there is a possibility of cross-infection through caregivers touch at multiple places when tending the infant. If the porthole cover is not closed properly, the infant may even fall out of the infant incubator.

The sound, disturbance of the micro-environment parameters and potential for infection makes portholes detrimental to maintaining a stable and safe environment for the infant. Such unstable conditions do compromise developmental care desired for the infant.


It would be desirable to have an improved technique to provide a stable and safe environment inside the infant incubator while tending the infant.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

Figure 1 depicts an infant incubator with gloves attached for infant care.

Figure 2 depicts the telescopic length of the gloves from wrist region to elbow region with hands of a care giver inserted inside the gloves and extending inside the infant incubator.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A glove for care of an infant in an infant incubator is disclosed. As depicted in Figure 1, the gloves comprise a pair of flexible elements which extend in the form of gloves and are engaged at a location where conventional portholes are provided in conventional infant incubators. When a care giver inserts both hands in the pair of flexible elements...