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A casino table game operation monitoring system (TgOM).

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000249569D
Publication Date: 2017-Mar-03
Document File: 5 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

SIGA Development Ltd and Global Gaming Resource, Inc. have developed several technologies for the non-invasive sensing of activity in casino games. Some of these technologies are computer vision applications for recognizing gaming objects from cameras located outside the area of play. Others are embedded sensors for use with roulette wheels, dice shakers, betting spots and card shoes. Since their creation, these technologies have had a successful history of deployment in table information displays and statistical reporting.

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SiGA Development Ltd & Global Gaming Resource, Inc.

Overview of System Functionality

Over the last ten years, SIGA Development Ltd and Global Gaming Resource, Inc. (SIGA & GGR) have developed several technologies for the non-invasive sensing of activity in casino games. Some of these technologies are computer vision applications for recognizing gaming objects from cameras located outside the area of play. Others are embedded sensors for use with roulette wheels, dice shakers, betting spots and card shoes. Since their creation, these technologies have had a successful history of deployment in table information displays and statistical reporting. Five years ago, these capabilities were sufficiently comprehensive that they were able to be combined into an application providing near-complete game status across several casino game types, allowing storage, analysis or publishing of activity on gaming tables. The system comprises hardware at the table (one or more cameras or other sensors) and software, which is modular and may be distributed between computers local to the table or in a back office, the modules communicating through a network. The lowest-level software is game-independent and recognizes gaming objects and their positions, identities, and times of appearance and disappearance. Objects detected include playing cards, cut cards, dice, dominoes, roulette wheels and balls, chips in the gaming areas, chips in the player stacks or chip tray, credit plaques, cash, markers ("dollies"), player loyalty cards and dealer ID cards. The next software layer interprets the object data according to the game rules. The interpreted output can be used to drive applications with scope varying from a single table to Internet-wide. SIGA Development Ltd & Global Gaming Resource, Inc. has developed several applications, but customers are free to develop their own. Applications currently include: Functions relating to a single table: * Providing data to table displays, showing game history, statistics, and strategy tips to novice players, * Detecting special game outcomes such as side-bets or jackpots, allowing more complicated side-game rules

with less dealer effort, and driving jackpot controllers. * Detection of game play and payout errors and cheating, such as late placing or removal of bets. Image

recording of unusual events is possible, and alerting of staff by messaging to mobile applications. * Evaluation of quantity of cash drop and chips at each table, enabling early detection of losses and

scheduling of fills or credits. * Assessment of player participation for comp calculations (player ID cards can be read by RFID or by

cameras if bar-coded and placed on the table). Functions useful within a casino or group of casinos: * Indication of table occupancy, guidance on anticipating staff levels, opening tables and setting table limits. * Comparison of dealer performance (speed and errors) * Alerting the Table Inspector (Pit Boss) to anomalies or the pos...