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Integrating Oxyfuel CO2 Purification Technologies with a Post-Combustion Capture Adsorption Unit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000249794D
Publication Date: 2017-Apr-05

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A preliminary analysis has been performed on integrating an adsorption unit used for capturing CO2 from flue gas with oxyfuel CO2 purification technologies. The reason for this is that adsorption processes typically struggle to achieve high CO2 purities without entailing an excessive cost both in terms of power and capital. The technologies used for oxyfuel CO2 purification on the other hand are well suited to efficiently producing CO2 at high purity. Their problem is that they need to be fed with a gas containing substantially more CO2 than the 10-15 % obtained from coal combustion. The combination of an adsorption unit concentrating the CO2 up to 50-80% and then feeding this to an oxyfuel purification technology to achieve 96-99.99 % CO2 would appear to be a good fit. Based on a simplified representation of the adsorption unit, an initial analysis has been performed looking at the power requirements for an oxyfuel purification process to produce 100 bara CO2 at 96 % purity. On the surface the results look promising but further work is needed to assess the power and capital requirements for the adsorption unit at different operating conditions to determine where the overall plant optimum lies. Options for returning the waste gas stream from the oxyfuel purification process back to the adsorption unit have been developed. The best way to integrate the waste stream with the adsorption unit depends on the type of adsorption cycle deployed and therefore needs to evaluated on a case by case basis. Calculations using a simple integration scheme did not result in excessive recycle rates and the alternative methods proposed may reduce it even further. Insufficient work has been performed on the merits of this idea to reach any definitive conclusions and there are many opportunities for further investigation. An initial starting point would be to evaluate at the relative power costs of producing high purity CO2 from a standalone adsorption unit versus a lower purity tail gas and adding on the oxyfuel CO2 purification unit. From there, different integration options and process operating conditions can be looked into.

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Technical Report

Integrating Oxyfuel CO2 Purification Technologies with a Post-Combustion Capture Adsorption Unit

29th March 2017

Andrew Wright

Chapter 1 – Executive Summary

A preliminary analysis has been performed on integrating an adsorption unit used for capturing CO2 from flue gas with oxyfuel CO2 purification technologies.  The reason for this is that adsorption processes typically struggle to achieve high CO2 purities without entailing an excessive cost both in terms of power and capital.  The technologies used for oxyfuel CO2 purification on the other hand are well suited to efficiently producing CO2 at high purity.  Their problem is that they need to be fed with a gas containing substantially more CO2 than the 10-15 % obtained from coal combustion.  The combination of an adsorption unit concentrating the CO2 up to 50-80% and then feeding this to an oxyfuel purification technology to achieve 96-99.99 % CO2 would appear to be a good fit.

Based on a simplified representation of the adsorption unit, an initial analysis has been performed looking at the power requirements for an oxyfuel purification process to produce 100 bara CO2 at 96 % purity.  On the surface the results look promising but further work is needed to assess the power and capital requirements for the adsorption unit at different operating conditions to determine where the overall plant optimum lies. 

Options for returning the waste gas stream from the oxyfuel purification process back to the adsorption unit have been developed.  The best way to integrate the waste stream with the adsorption unit depends on the type of adsorption cycle deployed and therefore needs to evaluated on a case by case basis.  Calculations using a simple integration scheme did not result in excessive recycle rates and the alternative methods proposed may reduce it even further.

Insufficient work has been performed on the merits of this idea to reach any definitive conclusions and there are many opportunities for further investigation.  An initial starting point would be to evaluate at the relative power costs of producing high purity CO2 from a standalone adsorption unit versus a lower purity tail gas and adding on the oxyfuel CO2 purification unit.  From there, different integration options and process operating conditions can be looked into.

Chapter 2 – Contents

Chapter 1 – Executive Summary. 2

Chapter 2 – Contents. 3

Chapter 3 – Copyright, Warranties and Licenses. 4

Chapter 4 – Introduction. 5

Chapter 5 - Process Integration of a Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Adsorption Unit with Oxyfuel CO2 Purification Technologies. 7

5.1         Trace Component Removal at Pressure (SOx, NOx and H2O). 10

5.2         Addition of a Membrane. 10

5.3         Waste Stream/Membrane Permeate Recycle and Integration with Adsorption Unit. 11

5.3.1          Recycle to Flue Gas Feed. 12

5.3.2          Recycle to Adsorption Unit Tail Gas. 12

5.3.3       ...