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Applications and Uses for Sucrose Fatty Acid Esters in Paint, Coatings and Paper Coatings

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000249901D
Publication Date: 2017-Apr-26

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Sucrose fatty acid ester (SFAE) development dates back to 1921 when Hess and Messner synthesized sucrose octapalmitate and sucrose octastearate. In the United States, efforts toward large scale production of SFAEs was initiated in 1952 by the Sugar Research Foundation. SFAEs are the reaction product of sucrose and fatty acids or fatty acid derivatives, such as fatty acid alkyl esters, fatty acid halides, and fatty acid anhydrides. The basic properties of SFAEs are highly dependent on the degree of sucrose esterification and the nature of the fatty acid ester groups. At relatively low degrees of sucrose esterification (e.g. 1 to 3 fatty acid esters per sucrose molecule), the resulting SFAEs are surface active, digestible, biodegradable, and non-toxic. As a result, they are produced commercially primarily for the food and personal-care industries. In the food industry, SFAEs with relatively low degrees for sucrose esterification (LS-SFAEs) are used as emulsifiers, foaming agents, viscosity reducers, anticaking agents, and fruit coatings.8 In the personal-care industry, LS-SFAEs are used as non-ionic surfactants/emulsifiers as well as anti-bacterial and anti-mycotic agents.9 At relatively high levels of sucrose esterification (e.g. 5 to 8 fatty acid esters per sucrose molecule), the materials are lipophilic and not surface active. The utility of these hydrophobic SFAEs for a variety of non-food/industrial applications was recognized quite some time ago. For example, a 1963 publication from the Sugar Research Foundation describes potential application of relatively highly-substituted SFAEs (HS-SFAEs) in printing inks, paints, varnishes, sealers, and binders for paper coatings/adhesives. This document describes a wide variety of applications for HS-SFAEs. The applications include paints, stains, varnishes, paper coatings, paper surface sizing, edible coatings for food, food packaging, artist paints, agricultural mulch, coatings for concrete panels, radiation-curable coatings, coatings/finishes for textiles, and coatings from waterborne acrylic emulsions.

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Page 1 Applications & Uses for Sucrose Fatty Acid Esters in Paint, Coatings & Paper Coatings

1

Keywords: sucrose fatty acid ester, sucrose polyester, sucrose octaester, sucrose soyate, sucrose octasoyate,

sucrose, soybean oil, sucrose linseedate, paint, coating, varnish, stain, alkyd, edible coating, paper coating, drying

oil, seed oil, artist paint, art work restoration, VOCs, volatile organic compound, yellowing, reactive diluent, high-

solids, drying time, renewable content, biodegradable, non-toxic, vegetable oil, starch, oil migration, paper,

paperboard, packaging, food packaging, water vapor transmission, recyclability, repulpability, water absorption,

water uptake, paper mulch, agricultural mulch, linseed oil, concrete form panels, textiles, water repellency, textile

coating, textile finish, fluorochemical replacement, silicone replacement, acrylic polymer, acrylic coating,

coalescent, coalescing agent, coalescing aid, acrylic graft copolymer, radiation-curable coatings, ultraviolet light-

curable coatings, UV-curable coatings, surface sizing, paper sizing, paper surface sizing

1.0 Description of Sucrose Fatty Acid Esters

Sucrose fatty acid ester (SFAE) development dates back to 1921 when Hess and Messner synthesized sucrose

octapalmitate and sucrose octastearate.1 In the United States, efforts toward large scale production of SFAEs was

initiated in 1952 by the Sugar Research Foundation.2 SFAEs are the reaction product of sucrose and fatty acids or

fatty acid derivatives, such as fatty acid alkyl esters, fatty acid halides, and fatty acid anhydrides.3 The basic

properties of SFAEs are highly dependent on the degree of sucrose esterification and the nature of the fatty acid

ester groups. Figure 1 provides a general chemical structure for SFAEs.4 At relatively low degrees of sucrose

esterification (e.g. 1 to 3 fatty acid esters per sucrose molecule), the resulting SFAEs are surface active, digestible,

biodegradable, and non-toxic.5,6 As a result, they are produced commercially primarily for the food and personal-

care industries.7 In the food industry, SFAEs with relatively low degrees for sucrose esterification (LS-SFAEs) are

used as emulsifiers, foaming agents, viscosity reducers, anticaking agents, and fruit coatings.8 In the personal-care

industry, LS-SFAEs are used as non-ionic surfactants/emulsifiers as well as anti-bacterial and anti-mycotic agents.9

At relatively high levels of sucrose

esterification (e.g. 5 to 8 fatty acid esters per

sucrose molecule), the materials are

lipophilic and not surface active. The utility

of these hydrophobic SFAEs for a variety of

non-food/industrial applications was

recognized quite some time ago. For

example, a 1963 publication from the Sugar

Research Foundation describes potential

application of relatively highly-substituted

SFAEs (HS-SFAEs) in printing inks, paints,

varnishes, sealers, and binders for paper

coatings/adhesives.10-13 A number of

publications from Edward G. Bobalek also

demonstrated...