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Fuselage mount radome one way aft decompression vent

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000249902D
Publication Date: 2017-Apr-27
Document File: 6 page(s) / 292K

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Adam Blackadder: INVENTOR

Abstract

A radome functions to serve as a protective cover to any antennae located inside them. Radome can be installed in many locations on an aircraft and in most cases an additional aerodynamic fairing or adapting interface plate with integrated skirt fairing is provided between the radome and the aircraft fuselage. These additional components are often referred to as fairings or antenna interface mounts (AIM's) with integral skirt fairings. Open vent holes are provided along the sides of the radome installation to release the internal fuselage pressure acting into the radome volume during a sudden decompression event. These open vent holes have protective splash guards to prevent fluids and other environmental factors from entering into the radome space. When installing the radome on large diameter aircraft fuselages, the available vertical height along the sides of the radome or attachment fairing is reduced and severely limit the available space for adequately sized venting features and subsequently impact the ability to achieve positive design margins. Moving the vent openings forward of the radome installation will induce a ram air effect due to the aerodynamic pressure of forward flight. Also moving the vent holes forward or aft of the radome results in an increasing loss of vertical height as the fuselage curvature approaches the top crown of the aircraft. This paper discusses a novel idea of providing a mechanical hinge joint flap or an elastomeric flap along the aft side of the radome, fairing, or antenna interface mount adapter plate skirt fairing, for relieving the pressure during a rapid decompression event. The differential pressure due to a rapid decompression event acts on the flap and forces it to release the pressure to the atmosphere, thus reducing the structural loading acting on the radome.

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Fuselage mount radome one way aft decompression vent

Adam Blackadder

ABSTRACT

A radome functions to serve as a protective cover to any antennae located inside them.

Radome can be installed in many locations on an aircraft and in most cases an additional

aerodynamic fairing or adapting interface plate with integrated skirt fairing is provided

between the radome and the aircraft fuselage. These additional components are often

referred to as fairings or antenna interface mounts (AIM’s) with integral skirt fairings. Open

vent holes are provided along the sides of the radome installation to release the internal

fuselage pressure acting into the radome volume during a sudden decompression event.

These open vent holes have protective splash guards to prevent fluids and other

environmental factors from entering into the radome space. When installing the radome

on large diameter aircraft fuselages, the available vertical height along the sides of the

radome or attachment fairing is reduced and severely limit the available space for

adequately sized venting features and subsequently impact the ability to achieve positive

design margins. Moving the vent openings forward of the radome installation will induce

a ram air effect due to the aerodynamic pressure of forward flight. Also moving the vent

holes forward or aft of the radome results in an increasing loss of vertical height as the

fuselage curvature approaches the top crown of the aircraft. This paper discusses a novel

idea of providing a mechanical hinge joint flap or an elastomeric flap along the aft side of

the radome, fairing, or antenna interface mount adapter plate skirt fairing, for relieving the

pressure during a rapid decompression event. The differential pressure due to a rapid

decompression event acts on the flap and forces it to release the pressure to the

atmosphere, thus reducing the structural loading acting on the radome.

1. INTRODUCTION

A radome functions to serve as a protective cover to any antennae located inside them,

while at the same time protecting the antenna from the environmental factors present

exterior to the aircraft during operation such as: aerodynamic pressure, lightning, hail and

rain, static electricity, and impacts such as like bird strikes. Radomes form an integral part

of an aircraft’s structural, aerodynamic and electrodynamic design and as such need to

meet the appropriate structural requirements per regional airworthiness regulations as

well as radio frequency performance requirements for electromagnetic signals passing

through them. A radome is typically tuned to the antenna frequencies of the antenna

within it.

A radome can be installed in many locations on an aircraft to suit the optimal placement

of the antenna. The most common installation locations are nose, dorsal centerline,

ventral centerline, and tail tip. In most cases an additional aerodynamic fairing or adapting

interface plate with integrated skirt fairing is provided that acts as a structural a...