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FLUID JOINT WITH OPTIMIZED SHAPE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000249952D
Publication Date: 2017-May-08
Document File: 6 page(s) / 366K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

An optimized shape is provided for a fluid joint such as a tee, a wye, or a fourway joint. This type of joint is useful, for example in a fluid flow duct such as an engine bleed air duct. A method is described for manufacturing the optimized shape.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 35% of the total text.

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FLUID JOINT WITH OPTIMIZED SHAPE

ABSTRACT

[0001] An optimized shape is provided for a fluid joint such as a tee, a wye, or a four-

way joint. This type of joint is useful, for example in a fluid flow duct such as an engine

bleed air duct. A method is described for manufacturing the optimized shape.

BACKGROUND

[0002] This disclosure relates generally to piping systems and fluid joints, and

particularly to fluid joints for piping systems in gas turbine engines.

[0003] A typical gas turbine engine includes one or more piping systems which serve to

transport fluids such as air, oil, fuel, or hydraulic fluids within the engine. These systems

include pipes or tubes which are joined to other tubes using fluid joints. Common fluid

joint configurations include shapes such as a "tee", a "wye", or a four-way joint.

[0004] Typically, conventional fluid joints are formed by a process such as hydroforming

which produces an item with uniform wall thickness. This type of design is not

"optimized", in the sense that in order to provide adequate material to withstand operating

stresses at all locations, some areas will have thicker material than required. This is due

to limitations of the manufacturing process.

[0005] Described herein are fluid joints having an optimized shape.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0006] The concept may be best understood by reference to the following description

taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing figures, in which:

[0007] FIG. 1 is a schematic perspective view of a conventional "tee" fluid joint;

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[0008] FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the fluid joint of FIG. 1;

[0009] FIG. 3 is a schematic perspective view of an optimized "tee" fluid joint;

[0010] FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the fluid joint of FIG. 3; and

[0011] FIG. 5 is a schematic perspective view of a sub- component of the optimized fluid

joint of FIG. 3.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE CONCEPT

[0012] Illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 is a schematic representation of a conventional fluid

joint 10 of a tee configuration with first and second legs 12, 14 arranged coaxially, and

terminating in first and second ports 16, 18 respectively at their distal ends. A third leg 20

intersects the first and second legs 12, 14 at a 90° angle and terminates in a third port 22

at its distal end. Collectively, the first, second, and third legs 12, 14, and 20 define a

hollow interior space 24 which is in fluid communication with the first, second, and third

ports 16, 18, and 22

[0013] As noted above, the conventional fluid joint 10 would typically be manufactured

using a process such as hydroforming. It can be seen in FIG. 2 that the fluid joint 10 has a

uniform wall thickness "W". As noted above, this design is not optimized.

[0014] Illustrated in FIGS. 3-5 is a schematic representation of an optimized fluid joint

100 of a tee configuration with a body 110 terminating in first and second coaxial ports

112, 114 at distal ends thereof. A side leg 116 intersects th...