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Maximizing Ferroelectric Behavior of Doped and Undoped Hafnium Dioxide Films by Specific Thermal Treatment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000249957D
Publication Date: 2017-May-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for utilizing extreme cooling rates (e.g., -400 K/s) immediately after the application of a crystallization temperature to maximize the ferroelectric behavior in doped and undoped HfO2.

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Title Maximizing Ferroelectric Behavior of Doped and Undoped Hafnium Dioxide Films by Specific Thermal Treatment Abstract Disclosed is a method for utilizing extreme cooling rates (e.g., -400 K/s) immediately after the application of a crystallization temperature to maximize the ferroelectric behavior in doped and undoped HfO2. Problem Due to its complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatibility and manufacturability, ferroelectric undoped and doped (Si, Zr, La, Y, Al, Gd, Sr) hafnium dioxide (HfO2) is a promising candidate for future embedded non-volatile memories (eNVMs). Improving the ferroelectric response of this new, hafnium dioxide-based material system brings benefits for memory applications based on undoped and doped hafnium dioxide (HfO2) with a unique/specific thermal regime. This is also possible for multilayer structures of doped (Si, Zr, La, Y, Al, Gd, Sr – in unlimited amounts of the dopant and number of dopants) and undoped HfO layers with an intercalation of thin films (metal or dielectric). Solution/Novel Contribution The novel contribution is a method for utilizing extreme cooling rates (e.g., -400 K/s) immediately after the application of a crystallization temperature to maximize the ferroelectric behavior in doped and undoped HfO2. Method/Process The extreme cooling rate (HCR RTP) causes a stronger quenching effect of the multicrystalline HfO2 layer and therewith a higher amount of the ferroelectric crystallographic phase of the HfO2 (doped and undoped) than standard state-of-the-art anneals (lamp- or laser based), which...