Browse Prior Art Database

Compact Square Motion Vault Gate Mechanism to Prevent Stringing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000249997D
Publication Date: 2017-May-15
Document File: 12 page(s) / 1M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Banknote validators used to detect and accept genuine banknotes from forgeries may encounter stringing frauds that a human cashier would not encounter. A stringing fraud occurs when a fraudster attaches a string or tape to a banknote and uses it to pull the banknote out of a banknote validator after obtaining credit. Banknote validator operators and manufacturers have employed various means to prevent frauds; however, many of these mechanisms occupy valuable space in the banknote validator, or consume significant power, or both. In this publication, a novel compact square motion mechanism is proposed to prevent stringing. In this publication, the problems faced by banknote validator operators and manufacturers due to stringing are discussed. The problems include but are not limited to theft, damage to the machine, and loss of business due to an inoperable machine. In addition, many countermeasures employed by both banknote validator operators and manufacturers are explained. These countermeasures include means to cut the string, means to lock the cashbox, use of a curved banknote path, rotating apertures, locking gates, optical sensors dedicated to detect string or tape attached to a banknote, and full image scanning to identify string or tape attached to a banknote. Many of these currently used methods operate with varying degrees of success. The method proposed in this publication appears to be fairly compact compared with the rotating aperture/gate designs currently used with the same size banknote aperture. The unique motion of the gates allows the size to be reduced as well as reduction in operating power consumption and materials cost.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 14% of the total text.

1

Publication

Title Compact Square Motion Vault Gate Mechanism to Prevent Stringing

Abstract

Banknote validators used to detect and accept genuine banknotes from

forgeries may encounter stringing frauds that a human cashier would not

encounter. A stringing fraud occurs when a fraudster attaches a string or

tape to a banknote and uses it to pull the banknote out of a banknote

validator after obtaining credit. Banknote validator operators and

manufacturers have employed various means to prevent frauds; however,

many of these mechanisms occupy valuable space in the banknote

validator, or consume significant power, or both. In this publication, a

novel compact square motion mechanism is proposed to prevent

stringing.

Problem Description

Automated payment devices, which include banknote validators, are

becoming increasingly common at pay kiosks, recharge stations for cell

phones, retail stores, automated teller machines (ATMs), gaming

machines and parking meters, in addition to traditional vending machines. Banknote valdiators use sensors (optical, capacitive, inductive, infrared,

ultraviolet and/or other) and software to detect if an inserted currency is

genuine or counterfeit. Banknote validators with progress sensors and

software, along with supporting hardware, can detect and reject high

quality counterfeit banknotes as well.

The proliferation of banknote validators is pushing fraudulent activity from

creating counterfeit banknotes to an activity known as “stringing”.

Stringing is a fraudulent activity in which a string or tape is attached to a

genuine banknote. A user inserts a banknote (with a string or tape

attached) into the validator, the banknote is validated, and the user

obtains credit. The user then pulls the string or tape which is attached to

the banknote, retrieving the banknote from the validator. Banknote

validators return banknotes to customers for many causes such as

misalignment, folds on a banknote, and multiple banknotes inserted in a

single attempt. In addition, banknote validators may return banknotes

that are worn out, torn, or that have a foreign material attached. The operational nature of banknote validators makes it difficult to detect

stringing during or after occurrences even with proliferation of automated

24-hour video monitoring services in the areas where banknote validators

are operated. A successful stringing activity cheats the owner/operator of

the service or product credited. An unsuccessful stringing activity can

damage a banknote validator due to the banknote and/or string or tape

being stuck in the banknote path.

2

In addition to detecting genuineness of a banknote, banknote validators need to prevent stringing attempts in a manner that causes minimum

damage to the banknote validator.

Background Information

Banknote validator manufacturers have been implementing different

means to prevent the menace of stringing. One type of countermeasure is

described in US6877599, where the banknote validator utilizes...