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System and Method for Synchronization of Flight Plan, Aircraft and Associated Aeronautical Information from the External Ground systems to the Airborne Equipment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000250044D
Publication Date: 2017-May-22
Document File: 7 page(s) / 493K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Visvanathan Thanigai Nathan, Abneesh Singla, Jagadeesh Shankar, Akshay Nelamangala Chandrappa: INVENTOR

Abstract

During the pre-flight procedures, aircraft pilots manually enter data into the airborne equipment such as Flight Management System (FMS). The data that has to be entered into the airborne equipment is provided by multiple agencies. This data include flight plan, aeronautical information and other aircraft related information which are created and distributed to the aircrafts by multiple agencies like GDC (Global Data Center) and AOC (Airline Operational Control). Due to conflicting demands, data transcriptions, time-pressure and other distractions during the pre-flight phase, the pilots may enter wrong data into the airborne system resulting in accidents and incidents. The prior systems either do not have any or partial mechanism for ensuring the correctness of data entry and its adequacy for the flight. This paper presents a novel idea of a system that autonomously enter the pre-flight data into an airborne equipment such as FMS, aircraft navigator etc. The system make use of Internet of Things (IOT) and connectivity for syncing flight plan and other associated information into the airborne equipment.

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System and Method for Synchronization of Flight

Plan, Aircraft and Associated Aeronautical

Information from the External Ground systems to the

Airborne Equipment

Visvanathan Thanigai Nathan; Abneesh Singla; Jagadeesh Shankar; Akshay N C Nelamangala Chandrappa

ABSTRACT

During the pre-flight procedures, aircraft pilots manually enter data into the airborne

equipment such as Flight Management System (FMS). The data that has to be entered

into the airborne equipment is provided by multiple agencies. This data include flight plan,

aeronautical information and other aircraft related information which are created and

distributed to the aircrafts by multiple agencies like GDC (Global Data Center) and AOC

(Airline Operational Control). Due to conflicting demands, data transcriptions, time-

pressure and other distractions during the pre-flight phase, the pilots may enter wrong

data into the airborne system resulting in accidents and incidents. The prior systems

either do not have any or partial mechanism for ensuring the correctness of data entry

and its adequacy for the flight. This paper presents a novel idea of a system that

autonomously enter the pre-flight data into an airborne equipment such as FMS, aircraft

navigator etc. The system make use of Internet of Things (IOT) and connectivity for

syncing flight plan and other associated information into the airborne equipment.

1. INTRODUCTION

The Flight Management System (FMS) has developed into a fully integrated aircraft

management system, communicating and controlling information from several sensors,

flight critical systems and numerous aircraft systems. However the FMS still rely upon

human or other external agencies to acquire some aircraft related information. These

information includes but not limited to flight plan created by GDC, fuel information from

AOC, aircraft weight and Centre of Gravity (CG), maintenance data etc. When airborne

equipment interacts with the external agencies, errors might occur and may result in

catastrophic accidents.

The IATA document entitled “FMS Data Entry Error Prevention Best Practices”, published

in 2015 discloses a total of 309 Air Safety Reports (ASRs) involving FMS data entry error.

The NASA document titled “Performance Data Errors in Air Carrier Operations” mentions

six kind of errors: 1) ground personnel errors in obtaining, calculating, and entering weight

data; 2) FMS data entry errors by flight crew; 3) errors made in checking against

limitations; 4) flap and trim configuration errors, 5) fuel weight errors by either ramp

personnel or pilots; and 6) errors by pilots using cockpit laptop performance computers

and electronic flight bag (EFB). Cutting across several of these six categories where

errors are made either by ground personnel or by pilots while manually entering data.

The current prevailing airborne equipment systems do not guarantee a flawless entry of

data from various external agencies. This invention proposes a central intelligence

system on...