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EXTENDING BIOMETRIC AUTHENTICATION TO OTHER DEVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000250155D
Publication Date: 2017-Jun-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Patrick Worfolk: INVENTOR [+2]

Abstract

Assume that a user typically uses her smartphone to connect with her bank and uses a biometric sensor (e.g., fingerprint sensor) to authenticate herself, thus not needing to remember a password. If this user wishes to use a legacy device with no biometric sensor, or even just another device that she is not enrolled with, then typically the user would have to recall the password. This invention allows the user to authenticate herself on the second device using the biometric sensor of the first device.

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Extending Biometric Authentication to Other Devices Patrick Worfolk

Copyright © 2017 Synaptics Incorporated, All Rights Reserved. Page: 1 of 3

Information contained in this publication is provided as-is, with no express or implied warranties, including any warranty of merchantability, fitness for any particular purpose, or non-infringement. Synaptics Incorporated assumes no liability whatsoever for any use of the information contained herein, including any liability for intellectual property infringement. This publication conveys no express or implied licenses to any intellectual property rights belonging to Synaptics or any other party. Synaptics may, from time to time and at its sole option, update the information contained herein without notice.

EXTENDING BIOMETRIC AUTHENTICATION TO OTHER DEVICES

1. Inventor(s): Patrick Worfolk Brian Roberts

2. Synaptics Incorporated, San Jose, CA, USA

3. Short Summary Assume that a user typically uses her smartphone to connect with her bank and uses a biometric sensor (e.g., fingerprint sensor) to authenticate herself, thus not needing to remember a password. If this user wishes to use a legacy device with no biometric sensor, or even just another device that she is not enrolled with, then typically the user would have to recall the password. This invention allows the user to authenticate herself on the second device using the biometric sensor of the first device.

4. Technological advantages This invention eases users from the burden of remembering and/or storing passwords, thus allowing for the use of more complex passwords and higher security. It proposes a lowest common denominator communication between a pair of devices to enable it.

5. General Description Assume that a user commonly uses an application tied to an online service (e.g., banking) that is FIDO® enabled on her smartphone that has a FIDO biometric identifier (e.g., a fingerprint reader). The user will initially login to the application the old fashioned way (e.g., username and password) and will then perform a FIDO registration step within the application. As a reminder the FIDO registration steps within the application are:

 User selects an available FIDO biometric identifier (e.g., fingerprint reader).

 User unlocks the FIDO authenticator using the biometric.

 The user’s device creates a new public/private key pair unique for the local device, online service and user’s account.

 The public key is sent to the online service and associated with the user’s account. The private key and biometric measurements never leave the device.

The next time the user wants to use the banking application on the same device, the user may do a FIDO login with the application as summarized below:

Extending Biometric Authentication to Other Devices Patrick Worfolk

Copyright © 2017 Synaptics Incorporated, All Rights Reserved. Page: 2 of 3

Information contained in this publication is provided as-is, with no express or implied warranties, including any warra...