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Connected Component Evaluation Tool (CCET)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000250298D
Publication Date: 2017-Jun-23
Document File: 6 page(s) / 219K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Connected component interpretation workflows can result in identification of tens, hundreds, or even thousands of potential features of interest, many of which are false positives, particularly when analyzing extremely large seismic surveys (i.e., 10,000's km2), seeking complex, subtle or small features of interest, such as channels or flat spots, or trying to exhaustively identify features of interest (i.e., without false negatives). The solution to the problem is the Connected Component Evaluation Tool (CCET). CCET is a utility that accelerates characterizing and high-grading seismic connected components. This tool enables users to sort through tens, hundreds, or thousands of connected components that have been identified by seismic attributes or other workflows, to locate, evaluate, document, classify and/or rank the connected components of most interest.

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Connected Component Evaluation Tool (CCET)

Abstract Connected component interpretation workflows can result in identification of tens, hundreds, or even thousands of potential features of interest, many of which are false positives, particularly when analyzing extremely large seismic surveys (i.e., 10,000’s km2), seeking complex, subtle or small features of interest, such as channels or flat spots, or trying to exhaustively identify features of interest (i.e., without false negatives). The solution to the problem is the Connected Component Evaluation Tool (CCET). CCET is a utility that accelerates characterizing and high-grading seismic connected components. This tool enables users to sort through tens, hundreds, or thousands of connected components that have been identified by seismic attributes or other workflows, to locate, evaluate, document, classify and/or rank the connected components of most interest. Problem Seismic connected components are interpreted 2D or 3D objects that contain connected samples (or voxels) of similar seismic amplitude or seismic attribute values extracted from 2D or 3D seismic surveys. Connected component extraction and analysis is a standard interpretation technology that has been widely used in the oil and gas industry for several decades. Connected components are commonly used to identify, visualize, characterize, map and/or model features of interest in seismic volumes. Examples of the types of features that can be captured by seismic connected components include channels, depositional lobes, salt diapirs, gas chimneys, and hydrocarbon reservoirs (Dopkin and Wang, 2010; Chaves et al., 2011; McArdle, 2014). Connected component interpretation workflows can result in identification of tens, hundreds, or even thousands of potential features of interest, many of which are false positives, particularly when analyzing extremely large seismic surveys (i.e., 10,000’s km2), seeking complex, subtle or small features of interest, such as channels or flat spots, or trying to exhaustively identify features of interest (i.e., without false negatives). Advanced technologies would ideally automatically only identify those connected components which represent true features of interest (i.e., no false positives), that is, without manual screening. However, identification of most features of interest in seismic volumes is still sufficiently challenging due to variations in character, size, rock properties, imaging, data quality, etc., thus manual screening is required. This task of reviewing sets of connected components to cull out the false positives, high-grade the connected components of most interest, and documenting the procedure and results, can be tedious, even for expert users, using current seismic interpretation systems. Components of this task include locating the features in 3D space, mapping the features, setting up optimal seismic displays to evaluate each feature, integrating other subsurface data (2D maps, volum...