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Edge chipping test for sintered diamond compacts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000250346D
Publication Date: 2017-Jul-03
Document File: 5 page(s) / 2M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Andrew Dean Gledhill: INVENTOR [+3]

Abstract

A new test method has been designed to test the resistance of the sintered diamond compacts to chipping from repeated impacts.

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Edge chipping test for sintered diamond compacts

Andrew Dean Gledhill Joseph M Rhodes

David Diaz Diamond Innovation, Sandvik Hyperion

Abstract

A new test method has been designed to test the resistance of the sintered diamond compacts to chipping from repeated impacts. Introduction

Previously, no laboratory test method which can be used to test the resistance of sintered diamond compacts to chipping from repeated impacts had been established. Currently, any testing of new cutters being developed needed to be tested in field trials, this can take some time and therefore the rate at which the development occurs can be slower than would be desirable. Therefore a new laboratory based test method has been developed, which is able to better predict how the cutter will perform in drilling applications where the cutters experience multiple impacts, without needing to immediately go to field trials. Detail

The test apparatus set up consists of placing multiple diamond cutters in a plastic jar with an impacting medium. The impacting medium is typically stainless steel or tungsten carbides balls. The container is sealed and then ultrasonically shaken at extremely high energies e.g. up to 90 G. This test method results in the compacts being subjected to hundreds of impacts on the cutter faces in the span of a few minutes. Examples Example 1:

In a first example, four cutters were placed in a 440 mL polypropylene jar; two samples of two different types of cutters were included. The cutters tested were a general market/balanced cutter, and a high impact cutter, which was designed to drill in applications where high impact loads are expected. The four cutters were affixed to the bottom of the jar; the working surface of each cutter was inclined 15 degrees from the bottom of the jar such that the high point on each cutter was the portion of the cutter nearest the center of the jar. A single two-inch steel ball bearing was placed in the jar, and the lid was attached. The jar was placed inside a Resodyn LabRam acoustic mixer, and shaken at 30 times the acceleration of gravity (G), for 60 seconds.

Figure 1: Cutters affixed to the bottom of the jar before the test.

Figure 2: Steel ball bearing placed in jar.

Figure 3: Resodyn...