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Method and Apparatus for Maelstrom-powered Self-contained Datacenter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000250383D
Publication Date: 2017-Jul-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 99K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a design for a self-contained datacenter which harnesses the maelstrom energy (which is circular, as opposed to single-direction waves/currents) found in oceans to completely power itself and utilize the cold water to aid in the system cooling.

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Method and Apparatus for Maelstrom-powered Self-contained Datacenter

Disclosed is a design for a self-contained datacenter which harnesses the maelstrom energy (which is circular, as opposed to single-direction waves/currents) found in oceans to completely power itself and utilize the cold water to aid in the system cooling.

Rising costs of providing power and cooling for computer systems in datacenters has resulted in power and cooling being most of the total cost of system ownership. Many alternate forms of providing power and cooling have been investigated. Companies have recently implemented ways of harnessing energy created by the ocean to provide power for datacenters. A company has also submerged a datacenter in the ocean to take advantage of the cold ocean water to minimize cooling costs. While various energy sources from the ocean (such as slow-moving surface waves and rip currents) have been harnessed, maelstroms (whirlpools of extraordinary size or violence) with circular motion have not. Maelstroms create the strongest (circular) tidal currents on the planet.

The novel contribution is a design for a self-contained datacenter which harnesses maelstrom energy (which is circular, as opposed to single-direction waves/currents) to completely power itself and utilize the ocean water to aid in the system cooling.

The core idea begins with encasing several computer servers in a waterproof container and immersing that container in the ocean at the epicenter of maelstroms. Energy harnessed as the maelstroms produce it can completely power the servers, with no attachment to an external power source. The position is adjustable to maximize the power generation. The cold ocean water can cool the servers. As it is immersed in the ocean, no external water source is needed. No radiator is needed to allow the heated water to cool. Additionally, sensors attached to the outside of the container can measure factors such as the heat, carbon dioxide levels, viruses, and currents in the ocean water.

Further, the ocean aides in buffering climate change, and many studies are ongoing that mine these data points to understand, predict, and mitigate the effects of global warming. Weather monitoring and reporting entities can share information about these data points.

An advantage of this solution is that maelstroms produce a much stronger tidal current then surface waves and typical rip currents. In addition, waves and rip currents generally travel in a single direction. Maelstroms are circular in nature, which should increase the efficiency of the energy conversion. No external power source cabling is needed. Another advantage is that larger maelstroms often exist in very cold ocean water, sometimes near the Arctic circle. The water would not need to be chilled before being used to cool the components in the servers, which would further reduce the...