Browse Prior Art Database

Application of thermoplastic compounds containing hollow glass microspheres for fluid injection molding

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000250423D
Publication Date: 2017-Jul-13
Document File: 1 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The term Fluid Injection Molding (FIT; German: "Fluidinjektionstechnik") summarizes several special injection molding technologies using fluids, like gas or water, to manufacture hollow plastic parts, e.g. for Automotive. The invention describes the application of Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGMs), e.g. 3M's Glass Bubbles, or Hollow Microspheres made of other materials in thermoplastic compounds to reduce the weight of plastic parts manufactured using FIT.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Application of thermoplastic compounds containing hollow glass microspheres for fluid injection molding Abstract: The term Fluid Injection Molding (FIT; German: "Fluidinjektionstechnik") summarizes several special injection molding technologies using fluids, like gas or water, to manufacture hollow plastic parts, e.g. for Automotive. The invention describes the application of Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGMs), e.g. 3M’s Glass Bubbles, or Hollow Microspheres made of other materials in thermoplastic compounds to reduce the weight of plastic parts manufactured using FIT. Detail: Gas assisted injection molding is a well-known special technology in the field of injection molding of thermoplastic materials. This technology enables the (economic) production of complex hollow parts, which can’t be molded (cost effectively) in a conventional way, e.g. by using molds with retractable cores. The first patent (US5066214 - "Injection molding apparatus") was published in 1988, with several related patents following in the past. The general principle is as follows: To produce a hollow part in a first step the molten thermoplastic material is injected into the cavity. To form the inner hollow a fluid (e.g. gas or water) is injected into the same cavity promptly after the melt is injected. As the solidification of the melt starts from the outside (material freezes at the cold mold surface) at this point the part is characterized by a solid skin layer, while the core is still capable of flowing. Thus the injected fluid pushes the molten core material forward and enables the formation of the hollow. Finally, after a certain cooling time, the thermoplastic material is fully solidified and the hollow part can be ejected.

Foam injection molding Another special injection molding technology is foam injection molding, which is used to produce lightweight plastic parts. This is achieved by either...