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Sampling Evolved Gas from a Shaped Charge

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000250438D
Publication Date: 2017-Jul-14
Document File: 6 page(s) / 257K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Knowing the composition and volume of the gaseous by-products produced when perforating is important information for rig-side safety. If the gas is allowed to vent at surface, enough noxious gases such as carbon monoxide may be created to endanger workers under certain conditions. Based on this information, safe well operations need to include steps for the proper handling of this gas after perforating. This disclosure discusses how to measure the composition and volume of gas emitted from the detonation of a single shaped charge. American Petroleum Institute Recommended Practices (API RP) 19B describes how to test perforating systems. Section 2 of API RP 19B describes the process and equipment required to evaluate the performance of a single shaped charge in terms of its penetration depth and hole size created in a subsurface cased well for which it was designed. For this application, API RP 19B Section 2 can also be configured to capture gases released by the detonation of a single shaped charge. This involves the addition of a wellbore chamber which surrounds the simulated perforating gun with vent ports located at the top for sample extraction.

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Sampling Evolved Gas from a Shaped Charge

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Table of Contents

Method to Capture Shaped Charge Gases using an API RP 19B Section 2 Apparatus ……...2 Abstract…….…………………………………………………………………………………………….2 How to capture the gas for composition and volume….…………………………………………….Error! Bookmark not defined. The first option…………………………………………………………………………………………...Error! Bookmark not defined. The second option……………………………………………………………………………………….Error! Bookmark not defined.

Figures

Figure 1 Sketch of API RP 19B Section 2 testing Layout…………………………………………...2 Figure 2 Image of gas sample bottle…………………………………………………………………..3

Table

Table 1 Gas components emitted from detonating an typical HMX deep penetrating charge….4

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Method to Capture Shaped Charge Gases using an RP API 19B Section 2 Apparatus Abstract Knowing the composition and volume of the gaseous by-products produced when perforating is important information for rig-side safety. If the gas is allowed to vent at surface, enough noxious gases such as carbon monoxide may be created to endanger workers under certain conditions. Based on this information, safe well operations need to include steps for the proper handling of this gas after perforating. This disclosure discusses how to measure the composition and volume of gas emitted from the detonation of a single shaped charge. American Petroleum Institute Recommended Practices (API RP) 19B describes how to test perforating systems. Section 2 of API RP 19B describes the process and equipment required to evaluate the performance of a single shaped charge in terms of its penetration depth and hole size created in a subsurface cased well for which it was designed. For this application, API RP 19B Section 2 can also be configured to capture gases released by the detonation of a single shaped charge. This involves the addition of a wellbore chamber which surrounds the simulated perforating gun with vent ports located at the top for sample extraction.

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Figure 1. Sketch of API RP 19B Section 2 testing layout.

How to capture the gas for composition and volume:

The objective is to shoot the shaped charge of known explosive content and mass into target components that closely match the downhole configuration expected in an actual well. This includes the gun scallop, the fluid gap with the proper completion fluid that would exist between the gun and the casing, the casing, the cement behind the casing, and the saturated rock as it would exist at bottom hole conditions. This is to ensure all the possible interactions are included that may influence the composition and quantity of perforation-created gas. The simulated lab gun will be fitted with an extra vent on the top plate that will open at detonation to ensure no gas is trapped in the lab gun during the test. Exotic materials, such as phenolic resin charge holders may also be included to cover all possible scenarios. Listed below are two techniques to capture the produced gas; both techniques pr...