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Foam Wound Dressing Articles Containing Nanoporous Microparticles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000250558D
Publication Date: 2017-Aug-02
Document File: 4 page(s) / 167K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present disclosure generally describes the incorporation of nanoporous microparticles into polyurethane foams. Such microparticle-containing polyurethane foams display a dramatic decrease in fluid wicking times in comparison to polyurethane foams lacking nanoporous microparticles. The polyurethane foams of the present disclosure may be included into medical dressing articles (e.g., wound and intravenous dressings) to improve the rate of removal of wound exudate or otherwise aid in fluid management properties of the dressing.

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1

Foam Wound Dressing Articles Containing Nanoporous

Microparticles

Introduction

The present disclosure generally describes the

incorporation of nanoporous microparticles into

polyurethane foams. Such microparticle-

containing polyurethane foams display a

dramatic decrease in fluid wicking times in

comparison to polyurethane foams lacking

nanoporous microparticles. The polyurethane

foams of the present disclosure may be included

into medical dressing articles (e.g., wound and

intravenous dressings) to improve the rate of

removal of wound exudate or otherwise aid in

fluid management properties of the dressing.

Examples

Example 1: Nanoporous Microparticle

Synthesis:

The synthesis of the nanoporous microparticles

generally follows that as described in U.S. Pat.

No. 9,422,411. In particular, 100 grams of

SR603OP (SR603OP is a trade designation for

polyethylene glycol (average molecular weight of

400 grams/mole) dimethacrylate obtained from

Sartomer Corporation, Exton, Pa., USA.) were

mixed with 43 grams of PPG (PPG refers to

polypropylene glycol (average molecular weight

of 4000 grams/mole) obtained from

Polysciences Incorporated, Warrington, Pa.,

USA.) and 250 milligrams of IRGACURE 819

(IRGACURE 819 is a trade designation for

bis(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)phenylphosphine

oxide obtained from BASF Corporation, Florham

Park, N.J., USA. This was used as a

photoinitiator.). The mixture was stirred

vigorously for 20 minutes. This second phase

mixture was then added to a first phase that

contained 750 grams of glycerol that had

previously been mixed with 15 grams of APG

325 (APG 325 is a trade designation for a blend

of decyl and undecyl glucosides, obtained from

BASF Corporation, Florham Park, N.J., USA.

This was used as a surfactant.). The mixture

was then shear mixed for 20 minutes using a

shear mixer at 700 rpm then spread between

two sheets of a polyethylene terephthalate

(PET) film, and cured for 15 to 20 minutes with a

100 Watt, long wavelength BLACK RAY UV

lamp (obtained from UVP, LLC of Upland, CA,

USA) positioned approximately 15 centimeters

above the material. The cured mixture was then

dispersed in 500 milliliters of isopropyl alcohol

(IPA), shaken vigorously for 30 minutes, and

centrifuged at 3000 rpm in an EPPENDORF

5810 R centrifuge (obtained from Eppendorf

International, Hauppauge, NY, USA) for 30

minutes. The supernatant was removed and the

resulting particles were re-suspended in 500

milliliters of IPA and subsequently centrifuged

again. The supernatant was discarded.

A scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of an

Example 1 particle is shown in Figure 1. The

SEM was generated using a Hitachi Model S-

4700 Field Emission Scanning Electron

Microscope (obtained from Hitachi High-

Technologies America, Inc., Schaumburg, IL,

USA).

Figure 1: SEM of the resulting particles:

2

Nanoporous Microparticles in Polyurethane

Foams

Test Methods

Density Measurement (g/mL): A sample of foam

0.5 inches by 2.5 inches was die cut from the

foam. The thickness wa...