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Hydroxyalkyl Ureas as Paper Additives

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000250590D
Publication Date: 2017-Aug-04
Document File: 8 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Roman Nowicki: INVENTOR [+3]

Abstract

The disclosure provides a composition of matter useful for producing very soft high grades of tissue paper. The composition of matter comprises an adhesive composition that includes a hydroxylalkyl urea material. The hydroxylalkyl urea (HAU) material prevents the composition from becoming brittle and is non-volatile. This allows the composition to become rewetted after creping and allows for strong levels of adhesion even at high temperatures.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 22% of the total text.

1

Use of Hydroxyalkyl Ureas as Paper Additives

The disclosure provides a composition of matter useful for producing very soft

high grades of tissue paper. The composition of matter comprises an adhesive

composition that includes a hydroxylalkyl urea material. The hydroxylalkyl urea (HAU)

material prevents the composition from becoming brittle and is non-volatile. This allows

the composition to become rewetted after creping and allows for strong levels of

adhesion even at high temperatures.

Background of the Disclosure

This disclosure relates to compositions of matter and methods of using them to improve

the physical properties of manufactured paper, in particular making soft tissue paper.

Typically, tissue paper obtains its characteristic properties of softness, bulk, absorbency,

and ability to stretch, by a process involving a Yankee Dryer apparatus. In conventional

tissue making the tissue is fed to the Yankee Dryer apparatus as a wet fiber web. The wet

fiber web is significantly dewatered at a pressure roll nip where the sheet is transferred to

the surface of a Yankee Dryer cylinder. At this point, the paper web typically has 35-40%

consistency (it is 65- 60% water). The sheet is further dried by the steam-heated Yankee

Dryer cylinder and hot air impingement hoods to 90-98% consistency and removed with

a doctor blade. The mechanical action of the blade results in a disruption of the fiber-fiber

bonds, which forms a micro-fold structure that gives the tissue paper its characteristic

properties. This process is referred to as creping.

Another method of creating the similar type of affect is the Through Air Drier (TAD) in

which the wet web directly from the former is pressed onto a wire (perforated) roll and

high velocity air is forced though the sheet. This TAD roll can have as much as 95%

open area to allow the air flow through. This pushes the wet fibers into the holes in the

roll and creates small indents or pockets in the sheet. The sheet exists the TAD and can

be collected directly on the take-up roll or go onto a Yankee drier for additional creping.

2

In order to properly crepe a paper web to make soft tissue paper, the paper web has to

adhere to the surface of the Yankee dryer cylinder. When the paper web then collides

with the doctor blade, microfolds are formed in the machine direction by the

compressing, or shortening action, while at the same time the web is separated from the

drying cylinder. This adhesion is facilitated by the application of an adhesive to the

surface of the dryer cylinder. In addition, wet- end furnish components can also

contribute to the adhesion that occurs. Commonly used Yankee adhesives are synthetic

polymers such as polyaminoamide-epichlorohydrin (PAE) resins, polyamine-

epichlorohydrin resins, polyvinyl alcohols, polyvinyl acetates, polyacrylamides,

polyamines, polyvinylamines, polyamides, polyvinylpyrrolidones, polyethers,

polyethyleneimines, cross linked vinyl alcohol copolymers, and others described i...