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VISUALIZATION OF MULTI-PHASE CONTRAST-ENHANCED CT IMAGES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000250898D
Publication Date: 2017-Sep-13
Document File: 4 page(s) / 1M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A novel visualization of multi-phase contrast-enhanced CT images include registering input phases precisely, and fusing the input phases using a special coloring that allows better visual separation of tissue types having different contrast uptake, to generate a combined visualization. Visualization of the joint information of multiple CT images adds value compared to reviewing CT images individually and/or sequentially.

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VISUALIZATION OF MULTI-PHASE CONTRAST-ENHANCED CT IMAGES

BACKGROUND

The present disclosure relates generally to computed tomography (CT), and more particularly to contrast-enhanced CT images.

Multi-phase contrast-enhanced CT is routinely used in clinical practice because it allows better separation of different soft-tissue types based on their characteristic contrast intake. However, the images need to be reviewed individually, that is, one-by-one. This sequential viewing needs time, and may be cumbersome. Furthermore, the sequential viewing only allows visualization of one image at a time.

Therefore, there exists a need for improved techniques to visualize such CT images.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates multiple phases of contrast-enhanced CT images.

FIG. 2 illustrates fusion of three-phase contrast CT.

FIG. 3  compares visualization with and without registration.

FIG. 4 illustrates potential applications of the present technique.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present disclosure provides a technique to visualize 3-phase contrast information to facilitate image reading. In the first step of the approach, the images belonging to the different phases are normalized and registered using a non-rigid registration method, for example, as shown in FIG. 1 below.

FIG. 1

In the second step the joint information of the three phases is fused into a color image (using red, green, and blue channels), as shown in FIG. 2, such that static voxels appear in grayscale, and contrast-enhanced voxels are displayed with various colors.

FIG. 2

The input phases (FIG. 1) are precisely registered and fused using a special coloring (FIG. 2) that allows better visual separation of tissue types having different contrast uptake. In some embodiments, registration re...