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Duplicate messages and SMTP (RFC1047)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000001853D
Original Publication Date: 1988-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 4K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

C. Partridge: AUTHOR

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC1047: DOI

Abstract

An examination of a synchronization problem in the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) is presented. This synchronization problem can cause a message to be delivered multiple times. A method for avoiding this problem is suggested. Nodding familiarity with the SMTP specification, RFC-821, is required.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 58% of the total text.

Network Working Group Craig Partridge Request for Comments: 1047 CIC at BBN Labs February 1988

DUPLICATE MESSAGES AND SMTP

STATUS OF THIS MEMO

An examination of a synchronization problem in the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) is presented. This synchronization problem can cause a message to be delivered multiple times. A method for avoiding this problem is suggested. Nodding familiarity with the SMTP specification, RFC-821, is required. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

INTRODUCTION

Over the past few years, the staff of the CSNET Coordination and Information Center (CIC) has often been asked to help determine why a single mail message is being delivered multiple times to its recipients. In the process of tracing the problems of multiple delivery, we have discovered that many duplicate messages are the result of a synchronization problem in SMTP. There is a point in the process of delivering a message where the receiving mailer knows it has accepted the message but the sending mailer is still not sure the message has been reliably delivered. If the SMTP conversation is broken at this point, the sending mailer will be forced to re-deliver the message, even though the message has already been received and delivered by the receiving mailer.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROBLEM

The synchronization problem occurs at the end of delivering a message. When the sending mailer has finished sending the text of a message, it is required to send a line containing a single dot or period. When the receiving mailer receives this final dot, it is expected to do its final message processing and either confirm receipt of the message (with a 250 reply) or reject the message with any one of several error codes.

Observe that there is a potential synchronization gap here. During the period between the time the receiving mailer has determined that it will accept the message, and the time that sending mailer gets the 250 reply, the message is active at both the sending and receiving mailer. Until the sending mailer gets the 250 reply, it must assume the message was not delivered. After the receiving mailer has

Partridge [Page 1]

RFC 1047 DUPLICATE MESSAGES AND SMTP February 1988

decided to accept the message, it must assume the message has been delivered to it. If the communications link fails during this synchronization gap, then the message has been duplicated. Both mailers have active copies of the message that they will try to deliver.

It may be hard to believe that this problem is the cause of many duplicate messages. Intuitively, one might expect that the time spent in the state between the final dot and its accepting 250 reply is quite small. In practice, however, this period is often quite long; long enough that timeouts by the sending mailer (or possibly network failures) are quite common. Observations by the author suggest that this synchronization pro...

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