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Browse Prior Art Database

NSFNET routing architecture (RFC1093)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000001902D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-15
Document File: 9 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

H.W. Braun: AUTHOR

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC1093: DOI

Abstract

This document describes the routing architecture for the NSFNET centered around the new NSFNET Backbone, with specific emphasis on the interface between the backbone and its attached networks.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 17% of the total text.

Network Working Group H.W. Braun Request for Comments: 1093 Merit February 1989

The NSFNET Routing Architecture

Status of this Memo

This document describes the routing architecture for the NSFNET centered around the new NSFNET Backbone, with specific emphasis on the interface between the backbone and its attached networks. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Introduction

This document describes the routing architecture for the NSFNET centered around the new NSFNET Backbone, with specific emphasis on the interface between the backbone and its attached networks. It reflects and augments thoughts described in [1], discussions during the Internet Engineering Task Force meeting at the San Diego Supercomputing Center in March 1988, discussions on mailing lists, especially on a backbone/regional network working group mailing list, and a final discussion held at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown, NY, on the 21st of March 1988. The Yorktown meeting was attended by Hans-Werner Braun (Merit), Scott Brim (Cornell University), Mark Fedor (NYSERNet), Jeff Honig (Cornell University), and Jacob Rekhter (IBM). Thanks also to: Milo Medin (NASA), John Moy (Proteon) and Greg Satz (Cisco) for discussing this document by email and/or phone.

Understanding of [1] is highly recommended prior to reading this document.

1. Routing Overview

The new NSFNET backbone forms the core of the overall NSFNET, which connects to regional networks (or regional backbones) as well as to peer networks (other backbones like the NASA Science Network or the ARPANET). The NSFNET core uses a SPF based internal routing protocol, adapted from the IS-IS protocol submitted by ANSI for standardization to the ISO. The ANSI IS-IS protocol is based upon work done at Digital Equipment Corporation. Its adaptation to the Internet environment requires additional definitions, most notably to the addressing structure, which will be described in a later document. This adaptation was largely done by Jacob Rekhter of IBM Research in Yorktown, NY. The RCP/PSP routing architecture was largely implemented by Rick Boivie and his colleagues at IBM TCS in

Braun [Page 1]

RFC 1093 NSFNET Routing Architecture February 1989

Milford, CT. The adaptation of EGP to the NSS routing code and the new requirements was done jointly by Jeff Honig (who spent about a week to work on this at IBM Research) and Jacob Rekhter. Jeff is integrating the changes done for the new EGP requirements into the "gated" distributions.

The IGP derives routing tables from Internet address information. This information is flooded throughout the NSFNET core, and the individual NSS nodes create or update their routing information after running the SPF algorithm over the flooded information. A detailed description of the NSFNET backbone IGP will be documented in a future document.

The routing interface between the NSFNET core and regional backbones as well as peer networks utilizes the Exterior Gateway Protocol (EGP). The EGP/IGP c...

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