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Client requirements for real-time communication services (RFC1193)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002006D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-11
Document File: 24 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

D. Ferrari: AUTHOR

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC1193: DOI

Abstract

This memo describes client requirements for real-time communication services. This memo provides information for the Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. It does not specify any standard.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 6% of the total text.

Network Working Group D. Ferrari Request for Comments: 1193 UC Berkeley November 1990

CLIENT REQUIREMENTS FOR REAL-TIME COMMUNICATION SERVICES

Status of this Memo

This memo describes client requirements for real-time communication services. This memo provides information for the Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. It does not specify any standard. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

A real-time communication service provides its clients with the ability to specify their performance requirements and to obtain guarantees about the satisfaction of those requirements. In this paper, we propose a set of performance specifications that seem appropriate for such services; they include various types of delay bounds, throughput bounds, and reliability bounds. We also describe other requirements and desirable properties from a client’s viewpoint, and the ways in which each requirement is to be translated to make it suitable for lower levels in the protocol hierarchy. Finally, we present some examples of requirements specification, and discuss some of the possible objections to our approach.

This research has been supported in part by AT&T Bell Laboratories, the University of California under a MICRO grant, and the International Computer Science Institute. The views and conclusions in this document are those of the author and should not be interpreted as representing official policies, either expressed or implied, of any of the sponsoring organizations.

1. Introduction

We call real-time a computer communication service whose clients are allowed to specify their performance requirements and to obtain guarantees about the fulfillment of those requirements.

Three terms in this definition need further discussion and clarification: clients, performance, and guarantees.

Network architecture usually consists, at least from a logical viewpoint, of a stack of protocol layers. In the context of such an architecture, the notions of client and server apply to a number of

Ferrari [Page 1]

RFC 1193 Requirements for Real-Time Services November 1990

different pairs of entities: every layer (with the support of the underlying layers) provides a service to the layer immediately above it and is a client of its underlying layers. In this paper, our considerations generally apply to any client-server pair. However, most of them particularly refer to human clients (users, programmers) and to the ways in which such clients express their communication and processing needs to the system (e.g., interactive commands, application programs). This type of client is especially important, since client needs at lower layers can be regarded as translations of the needs expressed by human clients at the top of the hierarchy. When the client is human, the server consists of the entire (distributed) system, including the hosts, their operating systems, and the networks interconnecting them.

As for the generic term, performance, we will...

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