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Technical Overview of Directory Services Using the X.500 Protocol (RFC1309)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002129D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-11
Document File: 16 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

C. Weider: AUTHOR [+2]

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC1309: DOI

Abstract

This document is an overview of the X.500 standard for people not familiar with the technology. It compares and contrasts Directory Services based on X.500 with several of the other Directory services currently in use in the Internet. This paper also describes the status of the standard and provides references for further information on X.500 implementations and technical information. This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 10% of the total text.

Network Working Group C. Weider Request for Comments: 1309 ANS FYI: 14 J. Reynolds ISI S. Heker JvNC March 1992

Technical Overview of Directory Services Using the X.500 Protocol

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This document is an overview of the X.500 standard for people not familiar with the technology. It compares and contrasts Directory Services based on X.500 with several of the other Directory services currently in use in the Internet. This paper also describes the status of the standard and provides references for further information on X.500 implementations and technical information.

A primary purpose of this paper is to illustrate the vast functionality of the X.500 protocol and to show how it can be used to provide a global directory for human use, and can support other applications which would benefit from directory services, such as main programs.

This FYI RFC is a product of the Directory Information Services (pilot) Infrastructure Working Group (DISI). A combined effort of the User Services and the OSI Integration Areas of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).

1. INTRODUCTION

As the pace of industry, science, and technological development quickened over the past century, it became increasingly probable that someone in a geographically distant location would be trying to solve the same problems you were trying to solve, or that someone in a geographically distant location would have some vital information which impinged on your research or business. The stupendous growth in the telecommunications industry, from telegraphs to telephones to computer networks, has alleviated the problem of being able to

DISI Working Group [Page 1]

RFC 1309 Technical Overview of X.500 March 1992

communicate with another person, PROVIDED THAT YOU KNOW HOW TO REACH THEM.

Thus, along with the expansion of the telecommunications infrastructure came the development of Directory Services. In this paper, we will discuss various models of directory services, the limitations of current models, and some solutions provided by the X.500 standard to these limitations.

2 MODELS OF DIRECTORY SERVICES

2.1 The telephone company’s directory services.

A model many people think of when they hear the words "Directory Services" is the directory service provided by the local telephone company. A local telephone company keeps an on-line list of the names of people with phone service, along with their phone numbers and their address. This information is available by calling up Directory Assistance, giving the name and address of the party whose number you are seeking, and waiting for the operator to search his database. It is additionally available by looking in a phone book published yearly on paper.

The phone companies are able to offer this invaluable service because they administer the pool of phone numbers. However, this service...

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