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IDPR as a Proposed Standard (RFC1477)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002304D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-10
Document File: 13 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

M. Steenstrup: AUTHOR

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC1477: DOI

Abstract

This document contains a discussion of inter-domain policy routing (IDPR), including an overview of functionality and a discussion of experiments. This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 11% of the total text.

Network Working Group M. Steenstrup Request for Comments: 1477 BBN Systems and Technologies July 1993

IDPR as a Proposed Standard

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

1. Introduction

This document contains a discussion of inter-domain policy routing (IDPR), including an overview of functionality and a discussion of experiments. The objective of IDPR is to construct and maintain routes between source and destination administrative domains, that provide user traffic with the services requested within the constraints stipulated for the domains transited.

Four documents describe IDPR in detail:

M. Steenstrup. An architecture for inter-domain policy routing. RFC 1478. July 1993.

M. Steenstrup. Inter-domain policy routing protocol specification: version 1. RFC 1479. July 1993.

H. Bowns and M. Steenstrup. Inter-domain policy routing configuration and usage. Work in Progress. July 1991.

R. Woodburn. Definitions of managed objects for inter-domain policy routing (version 1). Work in Progress. March 1993.

This is a product of the Inter-Domain Policy Routing Working Group of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).

2. The Internet Environment

As data communications technologies evolve and user populations grow, the demand for internetworking increases. The Internet currently comprises over 7000 operational networks and over 10,000 registered networks. In fact, for the last several years, the number of constituent networks has approximately doubled annually. Although we do not expect the Internet to sustain this growth rate, we must prepare for the Internet of five to ten years in the future.

Steenstrup [Page 1]

RFC 1477 IDPR July 1993

Internet connectivity has increased along with the number of component networks. Internetworks proliferate through interconnection of autonomous, heterogeneous networks administered by separate authorities. We use the term "administrative domain" (AD) to refer to any collection of contiguous networks, gateways, links, and hosts governed by a single administrative authority that selects the intra-domain routing procedures and addressing schemes, specifies service restrictions for transit traffic, and defines service requirements for locally-generated traffic.

In the early 1980s, the Internet was purely hierarchical, with the ARPANET as the single backbone. The current Internet possesses a semblance of a hierarchy in the collection of backbone, regional, metropolitan, and campus domains that compose it. However, technological, economical, and political incentives have prompted the introduction of inter-domain links outside of those in the strict hierarchy. Hence, the Internet has the properties of both hierarchical and mesh connectivity.

We expect that, over the next five years, the Internet will grow to contain O(10) backbone domains, most providing connectivity between many source and destination d...

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