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An Experiment in Remote Printing (RFC1486)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002313D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-10
Document File: 14 page(s) / 18K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

M. Rose: AUTHOR [+1]

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC1486: DOI

Abstract

This memo describes a technique for "remote printing" using the Internet mail infrastructure. In particular, this memo focuses on the case in which remote printers are connected to the international telephone network. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 14% of the total text.

Network Working Group M. Rose Request for Comments: 1486 Dover Beach Consulting, Inc. C. Malamud Internet Multicasting Service July 1993

An Experiment in Remote Printing

Status of this Memo

This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard. Discussion and suggestions for improvement are requested. Please refer to the current edition of the "IAB Official Protocol Standards" for the standardization state and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction .......................................... 1 1.1 The Advantage of a General-Purpose Infrastructure..... 2 2. Procedure ............................................. 2 2.1 Naming, Addressing, and Routing ...................... 3 2.2 The application/remote-printing Content-Type ......... 4 2.3 Usage Example ........................................ 5 2.4 Remote Printing without MIME ......................... 6 3. The Experiment ........................................ 7 3.1 Infrastructure ....................................... 8 3.1.1 Zones .............................................. 8 3.1.2 MX records ......................................... 8 3.2 Accounting and Privacy ............................... 9 3.3 Mailing list ......................................... 9 3.4 Prototype Implementation ............................. 10 4. Future Issues ......................................... 11 5. Security Considerations ............................... 11 6. Acknowledgements ...................................... 11 7. References ............................................ 11 8. Authors’ Addresses..................................... 12 A. The image/tiff Content-Type .......................... 13 B. Uniform Addressing ................................... 13

1. Introduction

Although electronic mail is preferable as a means of third-party communication, in some cases it may be necessary to print information, in hard-copy form, at a remote location. The remote output device may consist of a standard line printer, a printer with

Rose & Malamud [Page 1]

RFC 1486 An Experiment in Remote Printing July 1993

multiple fonts and faces, a printer that can reproduce graphics, or a facsimile device. Remote output may be accompanied by information that identifies the intended recipient. This memo describes a technique for "remote printing" using the Internet mail infrastructure. In particular, this memo focuses on the case in which remote printers are connected to the international telephone network. Furthermore, it describes an experiment in remote printing.

1.1. The Advantage of a General-Purpose Infrastructure

The experiment in remote printing is about "outreach"; specifically, integrating the e-mail and facsimile communities. By providing easy access to remote printing recipients, enterprise-wide access is enhanced, regardless of kind of institution (e.g., commercial, educational, or government), or...

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