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Pip Header Processing (RFC1622)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002457D
Original Publication Date: 1994-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-12
Document File: 16 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

P. Francis: AUTHOR

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC1622: DOI

Abstract

The purpose of this RFC and the companion RFC "Pip Near-term Architecture" are to record the ideas (good and bad) of Pip. This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 10% of the total text.

Network Working Group P. Francis Request for Comments: 1622 NTT Category: Informational May 1994

Pip Header Processing

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Preamble

During 1992 and 1993, the Pip internet protocol, developed at Bellcore, was one of the candidate replacments for IP. In mid 1993, Pip was merged with another candidate, the Simple Internet Protocol (SIP), creating SIPP (SIP Plus). While the major aspects of Pip-- particularly its distinction of identifier from address, and its use of the source route mechanism to achieve rich routing capabilities-- were preserved, many of the ideas in Pip were not. The purpose of this RFC and the companion RFC "Pip Near-term Architecture" are to record the ideas (good and bad) of Pip.

The remainder of this document is taken verbatem from the Pip draft memo of the same title that existed when the Pip project ended. As such, any text that indicates that Pip is an intended replacement for IP should be ignored.

Abstract

Pip is an internet protocol intended as the replacement for IP version 4. Pip is a general purpose internet protocol, designed to handle all forseeable internet protocol requirements. This specification defines the Pip header processing for Routers and Hosts.

Acknowledgements

I want to individually acknowledge Rob Coltun, Steve Deering, Ramesh Govindan, Joel Halpern, John Ioannidis, Chris Petrilli, Bob Smart, and Zheng Wang. I want also to acknowledge the many people from the Pip working group who have participated in developing Pip. Finally, I want to acknowledge the SIP protocol (or, more accurately, the people behind the SIP protocol) for providing certain good ideas.

Francis [Page 1]

RFC 1622 Pip Header Processing May 1994

Conventions

All functions in this specification are mandatory.

1. Introduction

Pip is an internet protocol intended as the replacement for IP version 4. Pip is a general purpose internet protocol, designed to handle all forseeable internet protocol requirements. This specification defines the Pip header processing for Routers and Hosts.

The design of Pip is fundamentally different from that of previous internetwork protocols. Pip is designed to be as general as possible, but without significantly compromising performance. Because of Pip’s generality, it can handle forseeable routing and addressing requirements. It is hoped that it will be able to handle most if not all future routing and addressing requirements.

There are many detailed aspects of Pip that provide this generality that are not discussed here. It is useful, however, to mention one general aspect. That is, Pip strives to remove as much "functional semantics" from the base specification as possible. Pip defines a packet header and forwarding rules that can include many different functional semantics (that is, routing, addressing, and flow paradigms). Therefore,...

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