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Simple Network Paging Protocol - Version 2 (RFC1645)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002481D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-12
Document File: 15 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

A. Gwinn: AUTHOR

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC1645: DOI

Abstract

This RFC suggests a simple way for delivering both alphanumeric and numeric pages (one-way) to radio paging terminals. This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 11% of the total text.

Network Working Group A. Gwinn Request for Comments: 1645 Southern Methodist University Obsoletes: 1568 July 1994 Category: Informational

Simple Network Paging Protocol - Version 2

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This RFC suggests a simple way for delivering both alphanumeric and numeric pages (one-way) to radio paging terminals. Gateways supporting this protocol, as well as SMTP, have been in use for several months for nationwide paging and messaging. In addition, email filters and SNPP client software for Unix and Windows are available at no cost. Please contact the author for more information.

Earlier versions of this specification were reviewed by IESG members and the "822 Extensions" Working Group. They preferred an alternate strategy, as discussed under "Relationship to Other IETF Work", below.

1. Introduction

Beepers are as much a part of computer nerdom as X-terminals (perhaps, unfortunately, more). The intent of Simple Network Paging Protocol is to provide a standard whereby pages can be delivered to individual paging terminals. The most obvious benefit is the elimination of the need for modems and phone lines to produce alphanumeric pages, and the added ease of delivery of pages to terminals in other cities or countries. Additionally, automatic page delivery should be somewhat more simplified.

2. System Philosophy

Radio paging is somewhat taken for granted, because of the wide availability and wide use of paging products. However, the actual delivery of the page, and the process used (especially in wider area paging) is somewhat complicated. When a user initiates a page, by dialing a number on a telephone, or entering an alphanumeric page through some input device, the page must ultimately be delivered to

Gwinn [Page 1]

RFC 1645 SNPP - Version 2 July 1994

some paging terminal, somewhere. In most cases, this delivery is made using TAP (Telocator Alphanumeric input Protocol, also known as IXO). This protocol can be a somewhat convoluted, and complicated protocol using older style ASCII control characters and a non- standard checksumming routine to assist in validating the data.

Even though TAP is widely used throughout the industry, there are plans on the table to move to a more flexible "standard" protocol referred to as TME (Telocator Message Entry Protocol). The level two enhancements to SNPP (as described below) are intended for use with this forthcoming standard.

However, acknowledging the complexity and flexibility of the current protocols (or the lack thereof), the final user function is quite simple: to deliver a page from point-of-origin to someone’s beeper. That is the simple, real-time function that the base protocol attempts to address. Validation of the paging information is left completely up to the paging terminal, making an SNPP gateway a direct "shim" between a pa...

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