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Referral Whois (RWhois) Protocol V1.5 (RFC2167)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002724D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-15
Document File: 69 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

S. Williamson: AUTHOR [+4]

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC2167: DOI

Abstract

This memo describes Version 1.5 of the client/server interaction of RWhois. RWhois provides a distributed system for the discovery, retrieval, and maintenance of directory information. This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 3% of the total text.

Network Working Group S. Williamson Request for Comments: 2167 M. Kosters Obsoletes: RFC 1714 D. Blacka Category: Informational J. Singh K. Zeilstra Network Solutions, Inc. June 1997

Referral Whois (RWhois) Protocol V1.5

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This memo describes Version 1.5 of the client/server interaction of RWhois. RWhois provides a distributed system for the discovery, retrieval, and maintenance of directory information. This system is primarily hierarchical by design. It allows for the deterministic routing of a query based on hierarchical tags, referring the user closer to the maintainer of the information. While RWhois can be considered a generic directory services protocol, it distinguishes itself from other protocols by providing an integrated, hierarchical architecture and query routing mechanism.

1. Introduction

Early in the development of the ARPANET, the SRI-NIC established a centralized Whois database that provided host and network information about the systems connected to the network and the electronic mail (email) addresses of the users on those systems [RFC 954]. The ARPANET experiment evolved into a global network, the Internet, with countless people and hundreds of thousands of end systems. The sheer size and effort needed to maintain a centralized database necessitates an alternate, decentralized approach to storing and retrieving this information.

Williamson, et. al. Informational [Page 1]

RFC 2167 RWhois Protocol June 1997

The original Whois function was to be a central directory of resources and people on ARPANET. However, it could not adequately meet the needs of the expanded Internet. RWhois extends and enhances the Whois concept in a hierarchical and scaleable fashion. In accordance with this, RWhois focuses primarily on the distribution of "network objects", or the data representing Internet resources or people, and uses the inherently hierarchical nature of these network objects (domain names, Internet Protocol (IP) networks, email addresses) to more accurately discover the requested information.

RWhois synthesizes concepts from other, established Internet protocols. The RWhois protocol and architecture derive a great deal of structure from the Domain Name System (DNS) [RFC 1034] and borrow directory service concepts from other directory service efforts, primarily [X.500]. The protocol is also influenced by earlier established Internet protocols, such as the Simple Mail Transport Protocol (SMTP) [RFC 821].

This RWhois specification defines both a directory access protocol and a directory architecture. The directory access protocol specifically describes the syntax of the client/server interaction. It describes how an RWhois client can search for data on an RWhois server, or how the client can modify data on the server. It also describes how the server...

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