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IETF Identification and Security Guidelines (RFC2323)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002890D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-15
Document File: 5 page(s) / 7K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

A. Ramos: AUTHOR

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC2323: DOI

Abstract

This RFC is meant to represent a guideline by which the IETF conferences may run more effeciently with regards to identification and security protocols, with specific attention paid to a particular sub-group within the IETF: "facial hairius extremis". This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 37% of the total text.

Network Working Group A. Ramos Request for Comments: 2323 ISI Category: Informational 1 April 1998

IETF Identification and Security Guidelines

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1998). All Rights Reserved.

1. Abstract

This RFC is meant to represent a guideline by which the IETF conferences may run more effeciently with regards to identification and security protocols, with specific attention paid to a particular sub-group within the IETF: "facial hairius extremis".

This document will shed further illumination on these problems and provide some possible solutions.

This memo provides entertainment for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind, but is rather unstandard, actually. Please laugh loud and hard.

2. Introduction

It has come to the attention of THEY [1] that a certain "facial hairius extremesis" of the male variety of the species "homo sapien" of the sub-culture "computeris extrordinarisis" have overrun the IETF conferences and thus led to the break-down of many identification and safety protocols.

3. Per Capita (Anecdotal) Evidence

While collecting research about the sub-group "facial hairius extremis" (FHE), it was noted that the per capita appearance of FHEs at IETFs was largely disproportional with the existence of FHEs in the world-at-large. In fact, the existence of facial hair at all within the IETF community is extraordinarily common among the males of the group. Apart from ZZ-Top and WWF Wrestling, it is not possible to find more facial hair within any occupational group. In

Ramos Informational [Page 1]

RFC 2323 IETF Identification and Security Guidelines 1 April 1998

this author’s own experience the average amount of men with long-term facial hair is less than 20%. Long-term versus short-term facial hair is a very important distinction as short-term facial hair, also known as the temporary illness "goatee universitis" (which symptoms range from full goatees to the less popular chin-goatee) is a common affliction for university-based males. Per capita (temporary) facial hair can go as high as 40%. However, among the males of the IETF the per capita long-term facial hair is as high as 60% [2].

Ordinarily, this abundance of long-term FHE would not require that an RFC be written. However, increasingly there have been issues regarding mistaken identification. For security purposes as well as ease of identification, this RFC will serve to clarify these issues and hopefully provide a solution for them.

4. Mistaken Identification Syndrome (or "Are you --jon. or Scott?")

I was speaking to a very well-known network researcher, I’ll call him --jon., who tells me that he is often mistaken for a SOBbing Harvard person. --jon. says, "People tell someone to look for me or him and say that I’m about so-tall with a big w...

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