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Server Cache Synchronization Protocol (SCSP) (RFC2334)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002902D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-15
Document File: 40 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Luciani: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC2334: DOI

Abstract

This document describes the Server Cache Synchronization Protocol (SCSP) and is written in terms of SCSP's use within Non Broadcast Multiple Access (NBMA) networks; although, a somewhat straight forward usage is applicable to BMA networks. [STANDARDS-TRACK]

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 4% of the total text.

Network Working Group J. Luciani Request for Comments: 2334 Bay Networks Category: Standards Track G. Armitage Bellcore J. Halpern Newbridge N. Doraswamy Bay Networks April 1998

Server Cache Synchronization Protocol (SCSP)

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1998). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

This document describes the Server Cache Synchronization Protocol (SCSP) and is written in terms of SCSP’s use within Non Broadcast Multiple Access (NBMA) networks; although, a somewhat straight forward usage is applicable to BMA networks. SCSP attempts to solve the generalized cache synchronization/cache-replication problem for distributed protocol entities. However, in this document, SCSP is couched in terms of the client/server paradigm in which distributed server entities, which are bound to a Server Group (SG) through some means, wish to synchronize the contents (or a portion thereof) of their caches which contain information about the state of clients being served.

1. Introduction

The keywords MUST, MUST NOT, REQUIRED, SHALL, SHALL NOT, SHOULD, SHOULD NOT, RECOMMENDED, MAY, and OPTIONAL, when they appear in this document, are to be interpreted as described in [10].

It is perhaps an obvious goal for any protocol to not limit itself to a single point of failure such as having a single server in a client/server paradigm. Even when there are redundant servers, there

Luciani, et. al. Standards Track [Page 1]

RFC 2334 SCSP April 1998

still remains the problem of cache synchronization; i.e., when one server becomes aware of a change in state of cache information then that server must propagate the knowledge of the change in state to all servers which are actively mirroring that state information. Further, this must be done in a timely fashion without putting undue resource strains on the servers. Assuming that the state information kept in the server cache is the state of clients of the server, then in order to minimize the burden placed upon the client it is also highly desirable that clients need not have complete knowledge of all servers which they may use. However, any mechanism for synchronization should not preclude a client from having access to several (or all) servers. Of course, any solution must be reasonably scalable, capable of using some auto-configuration service, and lend itself to a wide range of authentication methodologies.

This document describes the Server Cache Synchronization Protocol (SCSP). SCSP solves the generalized server synchronization/cache- replication problem while addressing the issues described above. SCSP synchronizes caches (or a portion of the caches...

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