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Making Postscript and PDF International (RFC2346)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002915D
Original Publication Date: 1998-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-15
Document File: 6 page(s) / 8K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Palme: AUTHOR

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC2346: DOI

Abstract

Certain text formats, for example Postscript (MIME-Type: application/postscript; file extension .ps) and Portable Document Format (MIME-Type: application/pdf; file extension .pdf) specify exactly the page layout of the printed document. The commonly used paper format is different in North America and the rest of the world. North America uses the 'Letter' format, while the rest of the world mostly uses the ISO-standard 'A4' format. This means that documents formatted on one continent may not be easily printable on another continent. This memo gives advice on how to produce documents which are equally well printable with the Letter and the A4 formats. This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 30% of the total text.

Network Working Group J. Palme Request for Comments: 2346 Stockholm University/KTH Category: Informational May 1998

Making Postscript and PDF International

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1998). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

Certain text formats, for example Postscript (MIME-Type: application/postscript; file extension .ps) and Portable Document Format (MIME-Type: application/pdf; file extension .pdf) specify exactly the page layout of the printed document. The commonly used paper format is different in North America and the rest of the world. North America uses the ’Letter’ format, while the rest of the world mostly uses the ISO-standard ’A4’ format. This means that documents formatted on one continent may not be easily printable on another continent. This memo gives advice on how to produce documents which are equally well printable with the Letter and the A4 formats. By using the advice in this document, you can put up a document on the Internet, which recipients can print without problem both in and outside North America.

A very short summary of the advice in this document: If you are using U.S. Letter paper format, ensure that both the left and right margins are at least 21 mm (0.8 in). If you are using A4 paper format, ensure that both the top and bottom margins are at least 33 mm (1.3 in).

Table of Contents

1. Introduction 2 2. Two methods for printing on different paper formats 2 2.1 Method 1: Use wider margins 2 2.2 Method 2: Print with reduced size 3 2.3 Method 3: Buy paper in the A4 size 4 3. Acknowledgements 4 4. Security Considerations 4 5. References 4

Palme Informational [Page 1]

RFC 2346 Making Postscript and PDF International May 1998

6. Author’s Address 5 7. Full Copyright Statement 6

1. Introduction

Certain text formats, for example Postscript (MIME-Type: application/postscript; file extension .ps) and Portable Document Format (MIME-Type: application/pdf; file extension .pdf) specify exactly the page layout of the printed document. The commonly used paper format is different in North America and the rest of the world. North America uses the ’Letter’ format, while the rest of the world uses the ’A4’ format.

The North American Letter format is 216 x 279 mm (8.5 x 11 in) while the ISO standardised A4 format is 210 x 297 mm (8.3 x 11.7 in). The Letter format is thus 6 mm (0.2 inches) wider, while the A4 format is 18 mm (0.7 inches) taller.

This means that documents formatted on one continent may not be printable on another continent. It is oboviously desirable that documents on the Internet are printable on all continents. This paper gives advice on how to achieve this.

This memo is not intended for HTML documents, but the advice may be of value also for HTML developers in case they are using fixed-size graphics and fixed WIDTH sizes of...

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