Browse Prior Art Database

Dual Stack Hosts using the "Bump-In-the-Stack" Technique (BIS) (RFC2767)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003365D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-10
Document File: 13 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

K. Tsuchiya: AUTHOR [+2]

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC2767: DOI

Abstract

This memo proposes a mechanism of dual stack hosts using the technique called "Bump-in-the-Stack" in the IP security area. This memo provides information for the Internet community.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 13% of the total text.

Network Working Group K. Tsuchiya Requests for Comments: 2767 H. Higuchi Category: Informational Y. Atarashi Hitachi February 2000

Dual Stack Hosts using the "Bump-In-the-Stack" Technique (BIS)

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2000). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

In the especially initial stage of the transition from IPv4 to IPv6, it is hard to provide a complete set of IPv6 applications. This memo proposes a mechanism of dual stack hosts using the technique called "Bump-in-the-Stack" in the IP security area. The mechanism allows the hosts to communicate with other IPv6 hosts using existing IPv4 applications.

1. Introduction

RFC1933 [TRANS-MECH] specifies transition mechanisms, including dual stack and tunneling, for the initial stage. Hosts and routers with the transition mechanisms are also developed. But there are few applications for IPv6 [IPV6] as compared with IPv4 [IPV4] in which a great number of applications are available. In order to advance the transition smoothly, it is highly desirable to make the availability of IPv6 applications increase to the same level as IPv4. Unfortunately, however, this is expected to take a very long time.

This memo proposes a mechanism of dual stack hosts using the technique called "Bump-in-the-Stack" [BUMP] in the IP security area. The technique inserts modules, which snoop data flowing between a TCP/IPv4 module and network card driver modules and translate IPv4 into IPv6 and vice versa, into the hosts, and makes them self- translators. When they communicate with the other IPv6 hosts, pooled IPv4 addresses are assigned to the IPv6 hosts internally, but the IPv4 addresses never flow out from them. Moreover, since the assignment is automatically carried out using DNS protocol, users do

Tsuchiya, et al. Informational [Page 1]

RFC 2767 Dual Stack Hosts using BIS February 2000

not need to know whether target hosts are IPv6 ones. That is, this allows them to communicate with other IPv6 hosts using existing IPv4 applications; thus it seems as if they were dual stack hosts with applications for both IPv4 and IPv6. So they can expand the territory of dual stack hosts. Furthermore they can co-exist with other translators because their roles are different.

This memo uses the words defined in [IPV4], [IPV6], and [TRANS-MECH].

2. Components

Dual stack hosts defined in RFC1933 [TRANS-MECH] need applications, TCP/IP modules and addresses for both IPv4 and IPv6. The proposed hosts in this memo have 3 modules instead of IPv6 applications, and communicate with other IPv6 hosts using IPv4 applications. They are a translator, an extension name resolver and an address mapper.

Figure 1 illustrates the structure of the host in which they are installed.

+----------------------------------------------------------+ | +--------------------...

Processing...
Loading...