Browse Prior Art Database

Internet Transparency (RFC2775)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003373D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-10
Document File: 18 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

B. Carpenter: AUTHOR

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC2775: DOI

Abstract

This document describes the current state of the Internet from the architectural viewpoint, concentrating on issues of end-to-end connectivity and transparency.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 8% of the total text.

Network Working Group B. Carpenter Request for Comments: 2775 IBM Category: Informational February 2000

Internet Transparency

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2000). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

This document describes the current state of the Internet from the architectural viewpoint, concentrating on issues of end-to-end connectivity and transparency. It concludes with a summary of some major architectural alternatives facing the Internet network layer.

This document was used as input to the IAB workshop on the future of the network layer held in July 1999. For this reason, it does not claim to be complete and definitive, and it refrains from making recommendations.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction.................................................2 2. Aspects of end-to-end connectivity...........................3 2.1 The end-to-end argument.....................................3 2.2 End-to-end performance......................................4 2.3 End-to-end address transparency.............................4 3. Multiple causes of loss of transparency......................5 3.1 The Intranet model..........................................6 3.2 Dynamic address allocation..................................6 3.2.1 SLIP and PPP..............................................6 3.2.2 DHCP......................................................6 3.3 Firewalls...................................................6 3.3.1 Basic firewalls...........................................6 3.3.2 SOCKS.....................................................7 3.4 Private addresses...........................................7 3.5 Network address translators.................................7 3.6 Application level gateways, relays, proxies, and caches.....8 3.7 Voluntary isolation and peer networks.......................8

Carpenter Informational [Page 1]

RFC 2775 Internet Transparency February 2000

3.8 Split DNS...................................................9 3.9 Various load-sharing tricks.................................9 4. Summary of current status and impact.........................9 5. Possible future directions..................................11 5.1 Successful migration to IPv6...............................11 5.2 Complete failure of IPv6...................................12 5.2.1 Re-allocating the IPv4 address space.....................12 5.2.2 Exhaustion...............................................13 5.3 Partial deployment of IPv6.................................13 6. Conclusion..................................................13 7. Security Considerations.....................................13 Acknowledgements...............................................14 References.....................................................14 Author’s Address....................................

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