Browse Prior Art Database

TCP Congestion Window Validation (RFC2861)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003461D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-13
Document File: 11 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

M. Handley: AUTHOR [+2]

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC2861: DOI

Abstract

This document describes a simple modification to TCP's congestion control algorithms to decay the congestion window cwnd after the transition from a sufficiently-long application-limited period, while using the slow-start threshold ssthresh to save information about the previous value of the congestion window. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 13% of the total text.

Network Working Group M. Handley Request for Comments: 2861 J. Padhye Category: Experimental S. Floyd ACIRI June 2000

TCP Congestion Window Validation

Status of this Memo

This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Discussion and suggestions for improvement are requested. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2000). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

TCP’s congestion window controls the number of packets a TCP flow may have in the network at any time. However, long periods when the sender is idle or application-limited can lead to the invalidation of the congestion window, in that the congestion window no longer reflects current information about the state of the network. This document describes a simple modification to TCP’s congestion control algorithms to decay the congestion window cwnd after the transition from a sufficiently-long application-limited period, while using the slow-start threshold ssthresh to save information about the previous value of the congestion window.

An invalid congestion window also results when the congestion window is increased (i.e., in TCP’s slow-start or congestion avoidance phases) during application-limited periods, when the previous value of the congestion window might never have been fully utilized. We propose that the TCP sender should not increase the congestion window when the TCP sender has been application-limited (and therefore has not fully used the current congestion window). We have explored these algorithms both with simulations and with experiments from an implementation in FreeBSD.

1. Conventions and Acronyms

The keywords MUST, MUST NOT, REQUIRED, SHALL, SHALL NOT, SHOULD, SHOULD NOT, RECOMMENDED, MAY, and OPTIONAL, when they appear in this document, are to be interpreted as described in [B97].

Handley, et al. Experimental [Page 1]

RFC 2861 TCP Congestion Window Validation June 2000

2. Introduction

TCP’s congestion window controls the number of packets a TCP flow may have in the network at any time. The congestion window is set using an Additive-Increase, Multiplicative-Decrease (AIMD) mechanism that probes for available bandwidth, dynamically adapting to changing network conditions. This AIMD mechanism works well when the sender continually has data to send, as is typically the case for TCP used for bulk-data transfer. In contrast, for TCP used with telnet applications, the data sender often has little or no data to send, and the sending rate is often determined by the rate at which data is generated by the user. With the advent of the web, including developments such as TCP senders with dynamically-created data and HTTP 1.1 with persistent-connection TCP, the interaction between application-limited periods (when the sender sends less than is allowed by the congestion or receiver windows) and network-limited periods (when the sender is limited by the TCP window) b...

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