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Browse Prior Art Database

A Vision of an Integrated Internet Information Service (RFC1727)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003975D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-12
Document File: 11 page(s) / 17K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

C. Weider: AUTHOR [+1]

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC1727: DOI

Abstract

This paper lays out a vision of how Internet information services might be integrated over the next few years, and discusses in some detail what steps will be needed to achieve this integration. This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 12% of the total text.

Network Working Group C. Weider Request for Comments: 1727 P. Deutsch Category: Informational Bunyip Information Systems December 1994

A Vision of an Integrated Internet Information Service

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This paper lays out a vision of how Internet information services might be integrated over the next few years, and discusses in some detail what steps will be needed to achieve this integration.

Acknowledgments

Thanks to the whole gang of information service wonks who have wrangled with us about the future of information services in countless bar bofs (in no particular order): Cliff Lynch, Cliff Neuman, Alan Emtage, Jim Fullton, Joan Gargano, Mike Schwartz, John Kunze, Janet Vratny, Mark McCahill, Tim Berners-Lee, John Curran, Jill Foster, and many others. Extra special thanks to George Brett of CNIDR and Anders Gillner of RARE, who have given us the opportunity to start tying together the networking community and the librarian community.

1. Disclaimer

This paper represents only the opinions of its authors; it is not an official policy statement of the IIIR Working Group of the IETF, and does not represent an official consensus.

2. Introduction

The current landscape in information tools is much the same as the landscape in communications networks in the early 1980’s. In the early 80’s, there were a number of proprietary networking protocols that connected large but autonomous regions of computers, and it was difficult to coalesce these regions into a unified network. Today, we have a number of large but autonomous regions of networked information. We have a vast set of FTPable files, a budding WAIS network, a budding GOPHER network, a budding World Wide Web network,

Weider & Deutsch [Page 1]

RFC 1727 Resource Transponders December 1994

etc. Although there are a number of gateways between various protocols, and information service providers are starting to use GOPHER to provide a glue between various services, we are not yet in that golden age when all human information is at our fingertips. (And we’re even farther from that platinum age when the computer knows what we’re looking for and retrieves it before we even touch the keyboard.)

In this paper, we’ll propose one possible vision of the information services landscape of the near future, and lay out a plan to get us there from here.

3. Axioms of information services

There are a number of unspoken assumptions that we’ve used in our discussions. It might be useful to lay them out explicitly before we start our exploration.

The first is that there is no unique information protocol that will provide the flexibility, scale, responsiveness, worldview, and mix of services that every information consumer wants. A protocol designed to give quick and meaningful access to a collection of stock prices might look functionally very...

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