Browse Prior Art Database

DNS Support for Load Balancing (RFC1794)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004048D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2019-Feb-12
Document File: 7 page(s) / 10K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

T. Brisco: AUTHOR

Related Documents

10.17487/RFC1794: DOI

Abstract

This RFC is meant to first chronicle a foray into the IETF DNS Working Group, discuss other possible alternatives to provide/simulate load balancing support for DNS, and to provide an ultimate, flexible solution for providing DNS support for balancing loads of many types. This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 22% of the total text.

Network Working Group T. Brisco Request for Comments: 1794 Rutgers University Category: Informational April 1995

DNS Support for Load Balancing

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

1. Introduction

This RFC is meant to first chronicle a foray into the IETF DNS Working Group, discuss other possible alternatives to provide/simulate load balancing support for DNS, and to provide an ultimate, flexible solution for providing DNS support for balancing loads of many types.

2. History

The history of this probably dates back well before my own time - so undoubtedly some holes are here. Hopefully they can be filled in by other authors.

Initially; "load balancing" was intended to permit the Domain Name System (DNS) [1] agents to support the concept of "clusters" (derived from the VMS usage) of machines - where all machines were functionally similar or the same, and it didn’t particularly matter which machine was picked - as long as the load of the processing was reasonably well distributed across a series of actual different hosts. Around 1986 a number of different schemes started surfacing as hacks to the Berkeley Internet Name Domain server (BIND) distribution. Probably the most widely distributed of these were the "Shuffle Address" (SA) modifications by Bryan Beecher, or possibly Marshall Rose’s "Round Robin" code.

The SA records, however, did a round-robin ordering of the Address resource records, and didn’t do much with regard to the particular loads on the target machines. Matt Madison (of TGV) implemented some changes that used VMS facilities to review the system loads, and return A RRs in the order of least-loaded to most loaded.

The problem was with SAs was that load was not actually a factor, and TGV’s relied on VMS specific facilities to order the records. The SA RRs required changes to the DNS specification (in file syntax and in

Brisco [Page 1]

RFC 1794 DNS Support for Load Balancing April 1995

record processing). These were both viewed as drawbacks and not as general solutions.

Most of the Internet waited in anticipation of an IETF approved method for simulating "clusters".

Through a few IETF DNS Working Group sessions (Chaired by Rob Austein of Epilogue), it was collectively agreed upon that a number of criteria must be met:

A) Backwards compatibility with the existing DNS RFC.

B) Information changes frequently.

C) Multiple addresses should be sent out.

D) Must interact with other RRs appropriately.

E) Must be able to represent many types of "loads"

F) Must be fast.

(A) would ensure that the installed base of BIND and other DNS implementations would continue to operate and interoperate properly.

(B) would permit very fast update times - to enable modeling of real-time data. Five minutes was thought as a normal interval, though changes as fast as every sixty seconds could be imagined.

(C) would cover...

Processing...
Loading...