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Composite Reusable Shock-Absorbing Shipping Frame

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000031216D
Publication Date: 2004-Sep-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 10K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This invention teaches a new method of shipping and handling newly manufactured major household appliances between the manufacturer and its major retailers. It utilizes the invention of a composite polymer based shipping frame with shock-absorbing properties, and is meant to replace the present shipping method of encasing the product in a cardboard box and placing said box on a static wooden pallet.

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Subject: Composite Reusable Shock-Absorbing Shipping Frame

Sketch and Description: (see concept artwork section)

Summary

This invention teaches a new method of shipping and handling newly manufactured major household appliances between the manufacturer and its major retailers. It utilizes the invention of a composite polymer based shipping frame with shock-absorbing properties, and is meant to replace the present shipping method of encasing the product in a cardboard box and placing said box on a static wooden pallet.

Problem to be Solved

Shipping and handling expenses are a non-value-added component of the production process of major household appliances. Also, these packaging materials alone incur considerable expense in their raw transport. They are as environmentally unfriendly as they are resource intensive in wood products.

Also, once used, they are generally and unrecoverable sunk-cost. The problem to be solved is to design a lower cost, environmentally friendly, and reusable shipping and handling system. This system also should provide greater protecting for the appliance during transit from the manufacture to the distributor or major retailer.

Additionally, when this composite shipping frame system is used

Detailed Description

For the past 100 years or so, the appliance industry has followed the following pattern fairly consistently. Although, perhaps in the very early part of the last century, prior to the miracle of cardboard, the actual 'box' was completely 'wood'. But for the most part, for the purposes of shipping and handling, major household appliances are packaged in large reinforced corrugated cardboard boxes, attached to wooden pallets or skids, and placed onto tractor trailer or rail cars for transport to major distribution facilities or retailers.

Item 1

The Invention will consist of a collapsible composite polymer based framing system consisting of a single unit of adjustable dimensions such that its padded endcaps would securely cover the 4 corners and 6 corner side portions of a medium to large size household appliance

Item 2

At the end of each corner brace will be and end cap consisting of 3 interior po...